Other AMS Sessions

MAA-SIAM-AMS Hrabowski-Gates-Tapia-McBay Session, organized by Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College; Wednesday, 9:00–10:20 am. The Hrabowski-Gates-Tapia-McBay Session is named after four influential scientists of color: (1) Freeman Hrabowski, President of the University of Maryland at Baltimore County; (2) James S. Gates, University of Maryland, College Park; (3) Richard Tapia, Rice University; and (4) Shirley McBay, President of Quality Education for Minorities (QEM). Through multiple mechanisms, these Sessions expect to facilitate and accelerate the participation of scientists in the building of sustainable communities of mathematicians and mathematical scientists. In particular, the intention is to systematically recruit, welcome, encourage, mentor, and support individuals from underrepresented groups in the USA. This year the session will consist of a lecture from 9:00-9:50 am given by Belin Tsinnajinnie, Santa Fe Community College, title to be annnounced, and a short panel discussion, title to be annnounced, from 9:50-10:20 am. Panelists will include Emille Davie Lawrence, University of San Fransisco; Belin Tsinnajinnie, Santa Fe Community College; and William Yslas Vélez, University of Arizona.

AMS Panel Discussion: Mental Health in the Mathematics Profession, organized by Justin Curry, SUNY Albany and Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson, CUNY College of Staten Island/CUNY Graduate Center, Wednesday, 2:15–3:45 pm. Mental health problems strike about 18.5% of the population at large in any given year, and the proportion is larger within academics. Chances are good that most mathematicians have had, or currently have, colleagues who struggle. The pressures of academia can exacerbate or cause problems, causing distress and derailing careers. While universities tend to meet undergraduate student needs, the support and the visibility decreases through the career stages - with insufficient support for graduate students, and far less for faculty. Awareness of mental health as an issue has been rising in recent year, most recently through JMM and the AMS Notices.

To invite our profession to build visibility and create a supportive community, we have gathered mathematicians from a range of career stages with immediate personal experiences to a panel discussion on life in mathematics with mental health problems - how we handle it, what worked for us and what didn't.

The moderator for this discussion is Helen Grundman, Bryn Mawr College. The panelists include Justin Curry, SUNY Albany, Adriana Salerno, Bates College, Christopher Tralie, Ursinus College, and Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson, CUNY College of Staten Island / CUNY Graduate Center.

AMS Special Event: Activities in NSF's Division of Mathematical Sciences (NSF-DMS), organized by Henry Warchall, NSF; Wednesday, 2:15 - 4:15 pm. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS), the major source of federal funding for mathematics research done at colleges and universities in the US, invites JMM 2020 attendees to get to know the Division’s scientific staff and learn more about its ongoing activities.

Join us for updates and new information on NSF funding opportunities of interest to mathematicians, followed by Q&A. This is an excellent occasion for informal group conversations with DMS program directors on the topics that interest you most!

AMS Committee on the Profession Panel Discussion: Mathematics and Ethics, Wednesday, 4:30–6:00 pm. Topics involving mathematics and ethics are many and multifaceted. In this panel we will concentrate our discussion on the following three themes:

1) Ethics in mathematics research. What are ethical concerns while doing and presenting mathematics research?

2) Teaching ethics in mathematics classes. How do we integrate ethics into the mathematics curriculum, so that future mathematical scientists are aware of ethical questions related to their expertise?

3) Teaching mathematics ethically. Do we teach mathematics as if it were a gateway to a realm to where some belong and others do not? How can we teach mathematics ethically and inclusively?

The moderator for this discussion is Gigliola Staffilani, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The panelists include Catherine Buell, Fitchburg State University, Michael Harris, Columbia University, Dagan Karp, Harvey Mudd College, and Jill Pipher, Brown University and President of the AMS. This panel is sponsored by the AMS Committee on the Profession.

AMS-MAA Panel Discussion on Looking for teaching oriented positions: A panel for graduate students and postdocs, organized by John Boller, University of Chicago, Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount, Solomon Friedberg, Boston College, Tom Roby, University of Connecticut, and Michael Weingart, Rutgers University; Thursday, 9:00–10:30 am. Many new PhDs in math will end up in teaching-oriented positions, but information about these positions, from their advantages, excitement and challenges to how to prepare for them, is not always available in research-oriented PhD programs. In this panel aimed at individuals considering a teaching-oriented position, we will discuss how to prepare for such positions, how to look for them, and how to make the most of them. Moderator for this panel will be Tom Roby, University of Connecticut. Panelists are Jennifer Beineke, Western New England University, Matthew DeLong, Marian University, Brendan Kelly, Harvard University, and Alicia Prieto Langarica, Youngstown State University. This panel is co-sponsored by the AMS-MAA Joint Committee on TAs and Part-time Instructors and by MAA Project NExT.

AMS-MAA Panel Discussion on Preparing your graduate students for teaching oriented positions: A panel for Ph.D. granting departments and faculty, organized by John Boller, University of Chicago, Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount, Solomon Friedberg, Boston College, Tom Roby, University of Connecticut, and Michael Weingart, Rutgers University; Thursday, 10:30–12:00 pm. Many new PhDs in math will end up in teaching-oriented positions, but information about these positions, from their advantages, excitement and challenges to how to prepare for them, is not always available in research-oriented PhD programs. In this panel aimed at faculty at Ph.D. granting institutions, we will discuss how to prepare your doctoral students for such positions, and how doing so can be advantageous for your PhD program and for our profession. Moderator for this panel will be Solomon Friedberg, Boston College. Panelists are Jennifer Beineke, Western New England University, John Boller, University of Chicago, Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University, Matthew DeLong, Marian University, and Natasha Speer, University of Maine. This panel is co-sponsored by the AMS-MAA Joint Committee on TAs and Part-time Instructors and by MAA Project NExT.

AMS Committee on Education Panel Discussion: Next Steps: Mathematics Departments and the Explosive Growth of Computational and Quantitative Offerings in Higher Education, organized by Katherine Kinnaird, Smith College and Katherine Stevenson, California State University, Northridge; Thursday, 1:00–2:30 pm. New computational and quantitative majors, minors, specializations, and certificates are flourishing in all sectors of American higher education. Examples include Certificates in Computational Intelligence and Linguistics, Bachelors degrees in Data Science, and Masters degrees in Financial Engineering. This reflects the increasing demand for quantitative competence in the workplace. What is certain is that student demand for these quantitative offerings is robust and departments that offer them typically seek and sometimes receive an increased number of faculty lines to respond to that demand.

There is little research on the role that mathematics departments play in these new computational and quantitative offerings. This panel explores current departmental practices worthy of attention in shaping computational and quantitative education writ large across the curriculum, and is a follow-up to the fall mini-conference hosted by the AMS Committee on Education. During this session, we will explore the role of mathematics in these computational courses and programs, practical ideas for implementing new modules in your existing courses, as well as methods for building new computational and quantitative courses in your department.

Panelists are: Henry Adams, Colorado State University; Mario Banuelos, California State University, Fresno; Katherine Kinnaird, Smith College; and Katherine Stevenson, California State University, Northridge.

Grad School Fair, Friday, 8:30-10:30 am. Here is the opportunity for undergrads to meet representatives from mathematical sciences graduate programs from universities all over the country. January is a great time for juniors to learn more, and college seniors may still be able to refine their search. This is your chance for one-stop shopping in the graduate school market. At last year's meeting over 300 students met with representatives from more than 60 graduate programs. If your school has a graduate program and you are interested in participating, for US$130 a table will be provided for your posters and printed materials (registration for this event must be made by a person already registered for the JMM), and you are welcome to personally speak to interested students. Complimentary coffee will be served. Co-sponsored by the AMS and MAA.

MAA-AMS Panel: Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey, organized by Allison Henrich, Seattle University, Emille Lawrence, University of San Francisco, Matthew Pons, North Central College, and David Taylor, Roanoke College; Friday, 1:00–2:20 pm. As mathematicians we know that struggle finds us all. There are the usual difficulties with content, but many of colleagues face more subversive trials. Struggling with mathematics is part of the journey, but it should not be soul-crushing, nor should it involve gender, race, sexuality, upbringing, culture, socio-economic status, educational background, or any other attribute. Over the past year, the panelists have collected short stories from all corners of the mathematical community. These stories are written to inspire current students across the country as they face individual struggles and will be published as a joint project by the MAA and AMS. This session will provide a chance for the panelists to discuss how the project started and evolved, the process of soliciting pieces, how to get copies of the collection, and then open it up to a Question & Answer session on struggle and resilience in our discipline.Panelists are Allison Henrich, Seattle University; Emille Lawrence, University of San Francisco; Matthew Pons, North Central College; Candice Price, California State University, Chico; Alicia Prieto-Langarica, Youngstown State University, and Robin Wilson, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. This panel is co-sponsored by the AMS and MAA.

Current Events Bulletin, organized by David Eisenbud, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute; Friday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm. Speakers in this session follow the model of the Bourbaki Seminars in that mathematicians with strong expository skills speak on work not their own. Written versions of the talks will be distributed at the meeting and will also be available online at www.ams.org/ams/current-events-bulletin.html after the conclusion of the meeting.

AMS Committee on Science Policy Panel Discussion: A Call to Action – Grassroots Advocacy for Our Profession, organized by Francis Su, Harvey Mudd College, Michael Vogelius, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and Suzanne Weekes, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Friday, 2:30–4:00 pm. Why is advocacy important? What are various ways that you, as a mathematician, can be an effective advocate for issues that affect our profession and our communities? How can you leverage your mathematical training in such endeavors? Four panelists, who have experience in various arenas, will share their perspectives. Moderator is Francis Su. Panelists are Kira Hamman, Penn State University; Anthony Várilly-Alvarado, Rice University; James Ricci, Daemen College; and State Director of Constituent Affairs, Office of Senator Michael Bennet (CO-D).

A Town Hall with the AMS Executive Director about the Future of the Joint Mathematics Meetings, organized by Dan Margalit, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Irina Mitrea, Temple University; Friday, 3:00–4:00 pm. The AMS and the MAA have co-hosted the Joint Mathematics Meetings (JMM) since 1998. Beginning in 2022, the AMS will be solely responsible for managing the JMM. This offers an opportunity to “re-imagine” the JMM, while carrying on the spirit of collaboration that has characterized the meeting. The AMS leadership has endorsed the principle that the JMM will strive to represent the full spectrum of interests of the mathematical community. AMS Executive Director Catherine Roberts will describe the status of AMS’s planning for the future of the JMM and will respond to questions from the audience. The mathematical community can also provide feedback directly to AMS at http://www.ams.org/about-us/jmm-reimagined. This event is sponsored by the AMS Committee on Meetings and Conferences (COMC).

AMS Congressional Fellowship Session, organized by Karen Saxe, American Mathematical Society; Friday, 4:30–6:30 pm. AMS Special Presentation on Congressional Fellowships. This fellowship provides a public policy learning experience, demonstrates the value of science-government interaction and brings a technical background and external perspective to the decision-making process in Congress. Learn more about this program and speak with current and former AMS Fellows. Speakers are: Lucia Simonelli, Office of Senator Sheldon Whitehouse and AMS Congressional Fellow 2019-20; Jennifer Pearl, Director, Science & Technology Policy Fellowships Program and AAAS; and Karen Saxe, American Mathematical Society Associate Executive Director & Director, Office of Government Relations. Application deadline for 2020-21 AMS Congressional Fellowship is February 15, 2020.

AMS Special Presentation: World Premiere of George Csicsery's film "Secrets of the Surface: The Mathematical Vision of Maryam Mirzakhani", organized by David Eisenbud, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute; Friday, 5:15–6:45 pm. Filmed in Canada, Iran, and the United States, “Secrets of the Surface: The Mathematical Vision of Maryam Mirzakhani” tells the story of a remarkable mathematician who became the first woman to win the Fields Medal. The film traces Mirzakhani’s ascent from high school and college in Iran, gold medals at two Math Olympiad competitions, and graduate school at Harvard to positions at Princeton and Stanford. Sequences filmed in Iran highlight the quality of science education for girls there. Mirzakhani’s mathematical contributions to the theory of Riemann surfaces are explained by colleagues and illustrated with animated sequences. Her classmates, teachers, friends and husband reflect on her personality, style, and creativity. The film emphasizes the importance of Mirzakhani’s legacy for girls interested in mathematics and science.

At the conclusion of the screening there will be a panel comprised of Jayadev Athreya, University of Washington, Hélène Barcelo, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, George Csicsery, Zala Films, and David Eisenbud, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute.

Who Wants to Be a Mathematician Championship, organized by Michael A. Breen, American Mathematical Society, and William T. Butterworth, DePaul University; Saturday, 10:00 am-11:45 am. Show your support for top high school students from the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. in this international Who Wants to Be a Mathematician as they compete for a US\$5,000 first prize for themselves and US\$5,000 for their school’s math department. Come match wits with the contestants, support their mathematical achievement, and have tremendous fun at the same time.

AMS Panel Discussion: Mathematics and Motherhood: A Town Hall with Women in Leadership, organized by Della Dumbaugh, University of Richmond, Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College, and Emille Davie Lawrence, University of San Francisco; Saturday, 4:30–6:00 pm. The moderator for this panel will be Karoline Pershell, Association for Women in Mathematics and Service Robotics and Technologies. Panelists will be Maeve McCarthy, Murray State University, Karen Saxe, American Mathematical Society, Maggy Tomova, University of Iowa, and Talithia Williams, Harvey Mudd College.

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