Joint Mathematics Meetings Program by Day

Current as of Wednesday, July 24, 2024 03:30:04

 
 

2025 Joint Mathematics Meetings (JMM 2025)

  • Seattle Convention Center and the Sheraton Grand Seattle, Seattle, WA
  • January 8-11, 2025 (Wednesday - Saturday)
  • Meeting #1203

Associate Secretary for the AMS Scientific Program:

Brian D. Boe, brian@math.uga.edu

 

Please note room assignments are subject to change right up until the meeting occurs. The program published here is continually updated and may be more current than the printed program.

Saturday January 11, 2025

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 7:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Joint Meetings Registration

    Atrium Lobby, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Applications and Generalizations of Zero Forcing, I

    Zero forcing is a graph coloring game developed to give an upper bound for the maximum nullity of a symmetric matrix that has its pattern of off-diagonal zeros determined by the graph. Variations of zero forcing emerged as tools for other problems in linear algebra and graph theory. Applications range from graph searching, control of quantum systems, recommender systems, and electric grid monitoring. This session explores new directions in this area and is connected to an AIM Research Community.
    3B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Mary Flagg, University of St. Thomas flaggm@stthom.edu
    Veronika Furst, Fort Lewis College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Pedagogical Practices in Math Circles and Other Non-Traditional, Informal, and Recreational Math Spaces, I

    Sessions on Math Circles often feature activity sharing. Here talks will emphasize key pedagogical practices in math circles that promote strong mathematical habits of mind and deepen students' mathematical identities. We have a particular interest in sharing practices and activities that promote the participation in math enrichment spaces by historically marginalized groups and students who have not developed a healthy math identity in their early years of schooling.
    3A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Amber Verser, Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics advNS@hampshire.edu
    Li-Mei Lim, Boston University
    Douglas O'Roark, Math Circles of Chicago

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applications of Algebraic Geometry, I

    In the last decade, tools from algebraic geometry have proven to be powerful in many applications. Areas of study such as algebraic vision, algebraic statistics, and data science, have enjoyed the benefits of this toolkit. Fueled by computational advances, the list of disciplines which have begun to use the technology of algebraic geometry is growing rapidly. Our session highlights recent progress of applied and computational algebraic geometers who build these interdisciplinary bridges.
    605, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Timothy Duff, University of Washington timduff@uw.edu
    Taylor Brysiewicz, University of Western Ontario
    Jessie Loucks-Tavitas, University of Washington
    Frank Sottile, Texas A&M University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applied and Computational Commutative Algebra, I

    Many recent breakthroughs in commutative algebra were made accessible with computational methods. In this session, we bring together commutative algebra researchers whose work includes an applied and computational aspect.
    607, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Eloísa Grifo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln grifo@unl.edu
    Branden Stone, Georgia Tech Research Institute

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Approximate Models of Fluid Motion, I

    In this special session, we explore approximate models for the complex behavior of fluid flow based on the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. Our focus lies on approximate models where nonlinearity, dispersion, and other effects are important. A diverse group of speakers will present recent theoretical, numerical, and experimental results based on linear, nonlinear, and nonlocal differential equation models.
    310, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anastassiya Semenova, University of Washington asemenov@uw.edu
    John D Carter, Seattle University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Artificial Intelligence Meets Computational Mathematics for Biological and Ecological Applications, I

    The cutting-edge conjunction of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Computational Mathematics will play a significant role in revolutionizing biological and ecological studies. This session will focus on the recent progress in modeling disease dynamics, computational techniques and AI that improve the state-of-the-art models and lead to the robust, accurate, and efficient numerical algorithms of the associated partial differential equations.
    213, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Md Kamrujjaman, University of Dhaka kamrujjaman@gmail.com
    Muhammad Mohebujjaman, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Taufiquar R Khan, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Categorical Generalizations of Conditionalization, I

    Our session aims to bring together diverse perspectives on extensions of Bayesian inference as a model for consensus building. Categorical reformulations of conditional probabilities empower richer explorations of phenomena arising when collections of \sigma-algebras and measures interact. Such approaches are employed to probe group decision making and human-AI interactions. We invite contributions across the spectrum, from theoretical formalisms to philosophical interpretations and applications
    Yakima 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Theodore V Theodosopoulos, Nueva School ttheodosopoulos@nuevaschool.org
    Owen Biesel, Southern Connecticut State University
    Colin McSwiggen, New York University
    Michael Titelbaum, University of Wisconsin -- Madison

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Combinatorial and Probabilistic Methods in Group Theory, I

    This special session will focus on recent developments in probabilistic, combinatorial and geometric group theory. Topics include random walks and probability measures on groups, growth and cogrowth, dynamical and geometric aspects of groups, groups arising from random processes in algebra and geometry, combinatorial and Burnside-type problems.Our aim is to bring together senior experts, early career mathematicians and graduate students to create a collaborative and diverse research atmosphere.
    Tahoma 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Be"eri Greenfeld, University of Washington beeri.greenfeld@gmail.com
    Gil Goffer, University of California at San Diego
    Tianyi Zheng, University of California San Diego

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Combinatorics and Graph Theory in Honor of Dr. Peter Johnson, I

    This special session honors Dr. Peter Johnson's contributions to the fields of graph theory and combinatorics, where he has conducted groundbreaking research, mentored, and inspired numerous scholars.
    Tahoma 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Alex Somto Arinze Alochukwu, Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Physics, Albany State University, USA alex.alochukwu@asurams.edu
    Fadekemi Janet Osaye, Alabama State University
    Michael Tait, Villanova
    Contacts:
    Paul Kenneth Horn, University of Denver
    Overtoun Jenda, Auburn University
    Peter Dankelmann, university of johannesburg
    Katherine Perry, Soka University of America
    Adam Blumenthal, Westminster College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Concordance and Cobordism in Low Dimensions, I

    Two $n$-manifolds are {\emph{cobordant}} if they cobound an $(n+1)$-dimensional manifold; two submanifolds $A,B\subset M^n$ are {\emph{concordant}} if they cobound a product inside the product $M\times I$. These two notions generalize typical equivalence relations such as {\emph{homeomorphic}} or {\emph{isotopic}}. Recent advancements, particularly in the realm of Floer homology, have significantly enhanced our understanding of cobordisms and concordances in low-dimensions.
    620, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ryan Stees, University of Virginia rs2sf@virginia.edu
    Abhishek Mallick, Rutgers University
    Maggie Miller, University of Texas at Austin

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Control Theory and Artificial Intelligence, I

    This session will feature talks on the links between control theory, optimal control, deep learning and artificial intelligence. This includes optimal control, two point boundary value problems and back propagation, geometric methods in control and Lie groups, methods for learning control and mechanical systems, and gradient methods on Lie groups and manifolds.This point of view, because it is built upon deep mathematical foundations, is well suited to having fundamental impacts on the field
    210, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anthony Michael Bloch, University of Michigan abloch@umich.edu
    Mohamed Ali Belabbas, University of Illinois

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Cryptography and Related Fields, I

    Cryptography is ripe with interdisciplinary research. This session aims to unite ongoing research in the mathematics of cryptography. Areas such as coding theory and number theory boast theoretical and practical applications that are especially significant to the effort to build a quantum-safe cyberspace. These areas have been sources for many of the hard problems (lattice reduction, elliptic curve isogeny, random matrix decoding, etc.) used in recently proposed post-quantum cryptosystems.
    Skagit 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ryann Cartor, Clemson University rcartor@clemson.edu
    Max Cartor, University of Louisville
    Angela Robinson, NIST

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Current Directions on Modular Forms: in Twenty Minutes Snippets, II

    Modular forms, functions possessing a large amount of symmetry are omnipresent in Number Theory and neighboring subjects. The goal of this special session is to provide experts to present to the mathematical community short talks about specific problems in which these functions play a role. The organizers will encourage thespeakers to aim their talks to a general mathematical audience.
    606, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Victor H Moll, Tulane University vhm@tulane.edu
    Olivia Beckwith, Tulane University
    Kalani Thalagoda, Tulane University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Ecological and Evolutionary Models in Biology and Epidemiology, I

    The session is focusing on investigation of how heterogeneity emerges across various developmental stages and spatial contexts, particularly in dynamic environments like those undergoing climate change, which shape ecological and evolutionary dynamics crucial for species survival, coexistence, and the outbreak of diseases.
    Skagit 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Yanyu Xiao, University of Cincinnati yanyu.xiao@uc.edu
    Yun Kang, Arizona State University
    Sabrina H Streipert, University of Pittsburgh

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Extremal and Probabilistic Combinatorics, I

    Extremal combinatorics is the study of the maximum or minimum size of combinatorial objects with some desired property. Probabilistic combinatorics studies properties of combinatorial objects that hold almost surely as the size of the object grows. These related fields are central in combinatorics and have significant applications in other areas of mathematics, computer science, engineering and bioinformatics. This session features new results, tools and open problems in this area.
    Tahoma 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jd Nir, Oakland University jdnir@oakland.edu
    Lina Li, Iowa State University
    Ruth Luo, University of South Carolina

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Financial Mathematics, I

    Research in Financial Mathematics is continuously leading to the development of highly sophisticated mathematical tools and inspiring a tremendous amount of interactions across various areas of Mathematics. The purpose of this session is to provide a platform for the dissemination of cutting-edge research in the field of financial mathematics, control theory, and related areas, and to report on their recent advances. It also provides an invaluable educational opportunity for graduate students.
    205, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sixian Jin, California State University San Marcos sjin@csusm.edu

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Function Spaces and Their Applications, I

    This session will bring together experts on function spaces and operators that live on them to discuss recent work and future avenues of research in the field. Applications in other fields of mathematics and engineering will also be included.
    203, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Javad Mashreghi, Laval University javad.mashreghi@mat.ulaval.ca
    William Verreault, University of Toronto

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Generative AI for Improving Instructional Productivity, I

    This session will explore the practical applications of generative AI to improve productivity in postsecondary mathematics education. Colleagues will share their experiments, experiences, and insights, highlighting the impact of this technology on instructional activities, including content creation, assessment, and student support. The presentations may focus solely on productivity aspects of using generative AI, and may also include discussions of the impact on student learning.
    Chelan 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University alayontf@gvsu.edu
    Erich McAlister, Fort Lewis College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Geometric and Topological Combinatorics, I

    Geometric and topological combinatorics is a thriving and very active area of research that explores and deepens connections between geometric structures, combinatorial problems, and algebraic and topological tools. In this session, we will showcase recent progress on many old and new problems in the field. Potential topics include combinatorics of simplicial and polyhedral complexes, matroid theory, lattice polytopes, and Helly-type theorems, to name just a few.
    Tahoma 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Bennet Goeckner, University of San Diego bgoeckner@sandiego.edu
    Gaku Liu, University of Washington
    Isabella Novik, University of Washington

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Geometry and Machine Learning, I

    Innovative research is being done at the intersection of geometry and machine learning, enriching both fields. Methods and techniques from geometry are being used to better understand the mathematical foundations of machine learning, and new tools and techniques from machine learning are being used to shed light on questions in geometry. This session will support the growing community of researchers working at this intersection.
    613, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tingting Tang, San Diego State University ttang2@sdsu.edu
    Yang-Hui He, City, University of London
    Fabian Ruehle, Northeastern University
    Yaim Cooper, University of Notre Dame

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on History of Mathematics, II

    Papers presented in these sessions will be on the history of mathematics from ancient to modern times, based on research carried out in the last three years. Topics include internal mathematical developments, external analyses of such developments, biographical accounts, descriptions of developments within specific periods, special issues related to mathematics, and accounts of events that affected the evolution of mathematics.
    608, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Victor J Katz, University of Washington vkatz@udc.edu
    Deborah Kent, University of St. Andrews
    E.A. Hunter, University of Chicago
    Sloan Evans Despeaux, Western Carolina University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Homotopy Theory, II

    Homotopy theory, the study of homotopy-coherent objects, is at the intersection of many different mathematical worlds, with deep connections to algebraic topology, algebraic geometry, number theory and category theory. This special session features talks on the various modern developments within homotopy theory.
    617, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    XiaoLin Danny Shi, University of Washington dannyshi@uw.edu
    Morgan Peck Opie, UCLA
    Piotr Pstragowski, Harvard University
    Kirsten Wickelgren, Duke University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on L-functions, Automorphic Forms, and Their Applications, I

    In recent years, analytic methods have been employed with great success to many problems of great importance in number theory, including subconvexity of L-functions, bounds for character sums, and the Langlands program. The purpose of this session is to report on some progress concerning these and related areas. This session will involve a mix of junior and senior researchers from around the country, will the goal of introducing new techniques and fostering future collaborations. 
    604, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sheng-Chi Liu, Washington State University scliu@math.wsu.edu
    Riad Masri, Texas A&M University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematical Quantum Chaos, III

    Mathematical quantum chaos has been focused on ergodic properties of high frequency eigenfunctions. One purpose of the session is to broaden mathematical investigation of manifestations of chaotic behaviour of quantum systems to include condensed matter physics, open quantum systems, quantum trajectories and other topics, stressing potential connections to modern physics.
    612, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Maciej Zworski, University of California, Berkeley zworski@math.berkeley.edu
    Semyon Dyatlov, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematics at Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), I

    Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) include national labs and contractors for government agencies such as the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. Their profile and culture lies between academia and the corporate world. In this session, researchers and administrators from will talk about some of the mathematical work done at FFRDCs. There will be a panel at the end to discuss career opportunities.
    Tahoma 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Wayne Raskind, Center for Communications Research, Princeton wraskind@gmail.com
    Carol Woodward, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on New Directions in Harmonic Analysis, I

    This session will focus on recent developments in harmonic analysis and related areas, with an emphasis on work by early-career researchers. Concentrating on the findings of junior analysts, the material presented will showcase the fresh perspectives of developing talent in new and ongoing directions related to harmonic analysis. Moreover, this session will present an inclusive environment to connect aspiring analysts to the broader mathematical community.
    304, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Cody B. Stockdale, Clemson University cbstock@clemson.edu
    Andrew Walton Green, Washington University In St. Louis
    Brandon Sweeting, University of Alabama
    Nathan A. Wagner, Brown University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Nonlinear Algebraic Methods in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, I

    Analytical methods based on linear algebra are ubiquitous primarily due to their computational feasibility, but real-world data is typically nonlinear. Nonlinear algebraic data analysis is emerging as a distinct research field from several separate efforts - tensor analysis, numerical algebraic geometry, (deep) neural networks, and invariant theory. The application of nonlinear algebra to AI and machine learning has the potential to more accurately and faithfully model complex, real-world data.
    Skagit 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jonathan Gryak, Queens College, City University of New York gryakj@gmail.com

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Operators in Inverse Problems, Differential Equations, and Machine Learning, I

    Operators in mathematical modeling are fundamental in explaining physical phenomena and predictions. We focus on inverse problems in PDEs and on the analysis of operators using numerical methods and data-driven tools. Speakers have developed novel approaches to solving PDEs, inverse problems, and problems from machine learning. Researchers at the beginning stage of their careers will also be able to interact with more established mathematicians.
    201, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Doosung Choi, Louisiana State University dchoi@lsu.edu
    Hyun-Kyoung Kwon, University at Albany
    Mikyoung Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Quaternions, I

    Presentations on the mathematics, applications, and historical development of quaternions. Algebraists, geometers, physicists, and other scientists actively conduct research involving quaternions. In addition to their interesting mathematical properties, quaternions have many applications: in classical mechanics to describe rotations; in Maxwell's development of E&M. Applications of quaternions are found in aeronautical engineering, computer graphics, molecular biology, and quantum field theory.
    602, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Chris McCarthy, BMCC, City University of New York mccarthyBMCC@yahoo.com
    Johannes Familton, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
    Terrence Richard Blackman, Medgar Evers College CUNY

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Developments in PDEs and Related Areas, I

    Partial differential equations are one of the major topics in mathematics. This session will highlight recent advances, including dispersive and elliptic equations, wave turbulence, numerical methods, and computer-assisted proof. We are committed to creating a vibrant and inclusive environment for scholars at different career stages and with diverse backgrounds. We aim to bridge theoretical mathematics with practical applications, engaging a wide audience and inspiring future mathematicians.
    303, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Weinan Wang, University of Oklahoma ww@ou.edu
    Zongyuan Li, City University of Hong Kong
    Xueying Yu, Oregon State University
    Zhiyuan Zhang, Northeastern University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Take the i Road: Welcoming Complex Numbers and Viewpoints Across the Undergraduate Curriculum, I

    Speakers will talk about using complex numbers and viewpoints to enrich undergraduate courses. Complex topics offer rich history, inviting visualizations, engaging extensions of ideas students have encountered, and opportunities for open-ended inquiry. Complex numbers, while crucial in the development of advanced mathematics, are not central to many undergraduate programs. This session should provide strategies, whether in modular units or full courses, to excite students and open new doors.
    Chelan 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Paul Zorn, St Olaf College zorn@stolaf.edu
    Bob Sachs, George Mason University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on The Convergence of AI, Math, and Statistics in Biomedical Research, I

    This session focuses on the role of mathematical, statistical, and AI methods in advancing our understanding of drug delivery, clinical trial analysis, and cancer classification. Speakers will discuss novel simulation approaches and data analysis techniques for drug release profiles, targeting strategies, and implementation of clinical trials. These tools along with AI can be leveraged to interpret complex biomedical data and shape the future of medical research and treatment strategies.
    Skagit 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Fnu Nisha, Clemson University nisha120226@gmail.com
    Keisha Cook, Clemson University
    Panelists:
    Baris Coskunuzer, UT Dallas
    Stanca Ciupe, Virginia Tech
    Akash Roy, Medical University of South Carolina
    Amanda Alexander, University of Houston
    Brighton Nuwagira, University of Texas at Dallas
    Sandra Annie Tsiorintsoa, Clemson University
    Seoyun Choe, University of Central Florida
    Arnaja Mitra, The University of Texas at Dallas, Mathematics Department

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Using 3D-Printed and Other Digitally-Fabricated Objects in the Mathematics Classroom, I

    In recent years, it has become easier and more affordable to 3D print objects for use in teaching and learning mathematics. Other technologies including thermoforming, CNC routing, and laser cutting have also become more accessible. Through this session, we aim to bring together educators who are interested in exploring how digitally fabricated tactile objects are being used to enhance learning in college-level mathematics classes.
    Chelan 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Shelby Stanhope, U.S. Air Force Academy shelby.stanhope@afacademy.af.edu
    Paul E. Seeburger, Monroe Community College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Vector Bundles and Quantization, I

    Moduli spaces of vector bundles, with or without additional decorations, over complex varieties are a major source of classical integrable systems. These include various classical integrable systems related to the KdV hierarchy as well as Hitchin systems. The algebraic nature of these spaces goes hand in hand with the existence of quantizations of these systems that can be interpreted algebraically or combinatorially, such as the approaches of Beilinson-Drinfeld and topological recursion.
    614, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Laura P. Schaposnik, University of Illinois at Chicago schapos@uic.edu
    Steven Rayan, University of Saskatchewan
    Ruxandra Moraru, University of Waterloo

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS-ASA-SIAM Special Session on Mathematics of Deep Learning: A High-Dimensional Probability Perspective, I

    This session explores the intersection of deep learning theory and high-dimensional probability. Experts from diverse fields will discuss (i) how probability theory provides new understanding to modern machine learning systems, e.g., precise asymptotics of model performance via random matrix theory and SDE description of training dynamics, and (ii) how deep learning introduces new problems in probability theory, such as the study of nonlinear random matrix ensembles and universality.
    Yakima 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Zhichao Wang, University of California San Diego zhw036@ucsd.edu
    Denny Wu, New York University
    Ioana Dumitriu, University of California San Diego
    Tony Chiang, Pacific Northwest National Lab

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS-MAA-SIAM Special Session on Research in Mathematics by Undergraduates and Students in Post-Baccalaureate Programs, III

    The session will offer students the opportunity to present research that they have done as part of an NSF-REU, MAA NREUP, or similar program, or on a research project done at their home institution. Abstracts from all areas of mathematics and mathematical sciences will be considered.
    Skagit 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Darren A. Narayan, Rochester Institute of Technology dansma@rit.edu
    Mark Daniel Ward, Purdue University
    Patricia Cahn, Smith College
    Khang Duc Tran, California State University, Fresno

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics, I

    The AWM workshop showcases recent work by two of the AWM Research Networks: Women in Operator Algebras organized by Maria Grazia and Sarah Reznikov, and Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics organized by Carolyn Abbott and Rachel Skipper. A juried Poster Session for graduate students, the AWM Panel: The Intersection of AI and Women+ in the Mathematical Sciences entitled, and a Mentoring Luncheon are organized by the AWM JMM organizing committee.
    4C-1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Carolyn Abbott, Brandeis University carolynabbott@brandeis.edu
    Rachel Skipper, University of Utah

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Operator Algebras, I

    The AWM workshop showcases recent work by two of the AWM Research Networks: Women in Operator Algebras organized by Maria Grazia and Sarah Reznikov, and Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics organized by Carolyn Abbott and Rachel Skipper. A juried Poster Session for graduate students, the AWM Panel: The Intersection of AI and Women+ in the Mathematical Sciences entitled, and a Mentoring Luncheon are organized by the AWM JMM organizing committee.
    619, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sarah Reznikoff, Virginia Tech
    Maria Grazia Viola, Lakehead University mviola@lakeheadu.ca

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    CRM-PIMS-AARMS Special Session on Optimal Transport - Theory and Applications, II

    This special session is organized by the PIMS kantorovich Initiative (kantorovich.org) which is dedicated towards research in the mathematics of Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport and its numerous applications to multiple areas of mathematics, statistics, data science, economics, engineering and so on. It features talks by several scientific leaders covering multiple areas of the theory of optimal transport and its applications and a large number of junior researchers.
    615, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Soumik Pal, University of Washington soumikpal@gmail.com
    Young-Heon Kim, University of British Columbia
    Brendan Pass, University of Alberta
    Yanqin Fan, University of Washington, SEattle
    Jingwei Hu, University of Washington
    Bamdad Hosseini, University of Washington
    Zaid Harchaoui, University of Washington, SEattle

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Preserver Problems, I

    This session concerns the study of maps on matrices or operators which preserve some interesting quantity, structure, or relation. Such problems have a long history, and arise naturally in both pure and applied mathematics. This special session will bring a variety of researchers together to share their recent results, methods, and problems.
    211, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Edward Poon, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University edward.poon@erau.edu
    Chi-Kwong Li, College of William and Mary
    Sushil Singla, Phd Student, Department of Mathematics, Shiv Nadar University Delhi NCR."
    Bojan Kuzma, University of Primorska

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Randomness in Numerical Linear Algebra, I

    In recent years, randomness and probability theory have started to play an increasing role in numerical linear algebra. From sketching to produce preconditioners for least squares problems to randomized perturbations to separate pseudospectra and compute eigenvalues of nonsymmetric matrices, the basic algorithms of numerical linear algebra are being modified. In this minisymposium we will explore some of these new ideas and their analysis.
    204, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anne Greenbaum, University of Washington greenbau@uw.edu
    Heather Denise Wilber, University of Washington

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    NSF Special Session on Outcomes and Innovations from NSF Undergraduate Education Programs in the Mathematical Sciences, III

    A number of NSF divisions offer a variety of grant programs that promote innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. Following a short presentation about these programs, the remainder of the session will feature opportunities to engage in small group discussions with NSF staff about program features, current NSF policy changes, proposal preparation guidance, and other related topics."
    603, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Moderators:
    Michael Ferrara, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation
    Organizers:
    Michael Ferrara, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation mferrara@nsf.gov

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Special Session on SIAM Minisymposium on Navigating the Future of Higher Education: The Role of AI in Teaching, Research, and Extension

    2B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Alvaro Ortiz Lugo, University of Cincinnati alvaro.ortiz@uc.edu
    Rafael Alberto Méndez-Romero, Universidad del Rosario

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    SIGMAA Special Session on Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology, II

    This session is dedicated to undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology. This session highlights research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology. The session also addresses the logistics of starting and maintaining an undergraduate research program in this area.
    610, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Timothy D Comar, Benedictine University timcomar@gmail.com
    Anne E. Yust, University of Pittsburgh
    Erin N Bodine, Rhodes College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    SLMath (MSRI) Special Session on at the Intersection of Harmonic Analysis and Fractal Geometry, I

    We explore emerging links in Harmonic Analysis and Geometric Measure Theory with applications to Ergodic Theory, Dynamical Systems, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. Different tools and fundamental questions exist in the communities but they unite around the following themes: Investigating finite point configurations; properties of projections; Combinatorial problems in fractal geometry (distance and direction sets, arithmetic progressions, Kakeya-type sets).
    611, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Krystal Taylor, The Ohio State University taylor.2952@osu.edu
    Scott Zimmerman, The Ohio State University At Marion
    Alex McDonald, The Ohio State University
    Samantha Sandberg, The Ohio State University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    MAA Contributed Paper Session on SIGMAA Contributed Paper Session on Using AI in Mathematics Instruction, II

    609, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Shanda Renee Hood, University of Arkansas hoods@uark.edu
    Brian D Walton, James Madison University
    Bernd Sing, University of the West Indies at Cave Hill
    Joseph Fields, Southern Connecticut State University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    TPSE Workshop: Teaching and Managing Large Undergraduate Mathematics Courses in a Changing World

    This session will bring together faculty who are connected with the administration and instruction of mathematics courses and programs at large, especially public, universities. Short presentations will highlight challenges and successes in the education of students in these at scale courses, with time allocated to discuss and reflect on the applicability of the material in the presentations to other institutions and settings.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    P Gavin Larose, University of Michigan
    Bryan David Mosher, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    JMM Panel on The Role of Technology in Linear Algebra Education

    Linear algebra is a vital topic in mathematics and has enormous applications in other fields. The goal of this panel is to discuss the role of mathematics programming software in linear algebra education. The panelists will share their experiences and insights in integrating programming languages in linear algebra courses. In addition, the panelists will broaden this timely conversation and critically consider the wider picture of how to provide students need in 2030 and beyond.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Moderators:
    Sepideh Stewart, University of Oklahoma
    Organizers:
    Sepideh Stewart, University of Oklahoma
    Judi J McDonald, Washington State University
    Panelists:
    Judi J McDonald, Washington State University
    Sheldon Axler, San Francisco State University
    Jeffrey Meyer, California State University, San Bernardino
    Emily J Evans, Brigham Young University
    David Strong, Pepperdine University
    Frank Uhlig, Auburn University
    Mike Michailidis, The MathWorks, Inc.
    Gabriel Martins, Sacramento State University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Julia Robinson Math Festival

    Hall 4B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Daniel Kline, Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
    Exhibits and Book Sales

    Hall 4A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    ASL Invited Address

    Organizers:
    David Reed Solomon, University of Connecticut
    True Stages for Computability and Effective Descriptive Set Theory
    2A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Dan Turetsky*, Victoria University of Wellington
    (1203--36819)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
    Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) 3B: Mentoring for Equity: Accounting for Identity and Culture in Our Most Important of Relationships

    On completing this PEP, participants are expected to gain: -A more inclusive and expansive definition of mentoring that facilitates broadening participation in mathematics. -Increased awareness of the impact of identity and culture on mentoring and methods to use these differences as strengths in the mentoring relationship. -Access to multiple inclusive mentoring practices, ranging from concrete actions for immediate implementation to more impactful changes that will require more work over time.
    Willow A, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Abbe Herzig, Bard Prison Initiative
    Emily Moore, University of Oregon
    Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
    COMAP Workshop on Modeling for Educators: Introducing All Students to Modeling

    This workshop will explore a variety of activities for introducing mathematical modeling to students with prerequisite knowledge of Algebra II or higher. This hands-on session will provide participants with the opportunity to build multiple real-world inspired models that utilize curricular mathematics and highlight modeling competencies. Approaches for adapting COMAP contest problems as well as known models for classroom use will also be explored. Numerous modeling resources will be shared.
    Grand Ballroom AB, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Moderators:
    Kayla Blyman, Saint Martin's University
    Adewale Adeolu, Clarkson University
    Organizers:
    Ben Galuzzo, Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP)
    Kayla Blyman, Saint Martin's University
    Contacts:
    Kim A Kuda, COMAP
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
    JMM Networking Center - Skybridge

    JMM Networking Center - Skybridge
    Hall 4D - Skybridge, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
    JMM Networking Center - Tahoma Foyer

    JMM Networking Center - Tahoma Foyer
    Tahoma Foyer, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 9:40 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
    AMS Lecture on Education

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Title to be announced
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Pamela Estephania Harris*, Williams College
    (1203--36491)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
    NAM Business Meeting

    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Aris Winger, Georgia Gwinnett College
    Torina D. Lewis, National Association of Mathematicians
    Omayra Ortega, Sonoma State University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
    Exhibitor Presentation Theater

    Hall 4A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
    ASL Invited Address

    Organizers:
    David Reed Solomon, University of Connecticut
    Lang-Weil Estimate in Finite Difference Fields
    2A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Jinhe Ye*, University of Oxford
    (1203--36820)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    MAA Panel: Teaching and Learning Calculus in an AI World

    Since the release of Wolfram Alpha (2009), mathematics educators have been contending with the interface of technology that answers mathematical questions and teaching and learning mathematics. Today's Large Language Models and algorithmic software make this question even more relevant. The panelists will discuss their thinking about concepts central to understanding calculus and how instruction can be shaped so learning takes place, share strategies from their classrooms, and lessons learned.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Gail F Burrill, Michigan State University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 10:50 a.m.-11:55 a.m.
    JPBM Communications Award Lecture

    Organizers:
    J. Michael Pearson, Mathematical Association of America
    Title to be announced
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    (1203--36492)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
    SLMath (MSRI) & NAM: Film World Premiere of George Csicsery's "Journeys of Black Mathematicians: Part 2" and Panel Discussion

    World Premiere of George Csicsery's new film. This documentary series features interviews with contemporary Black American researchers and educators and surveys innovative educational programs in math at every level from grade school through undergraduate and postdocs. At the conclusion of the screening there will be a panel discussion. (For information on the film series, visit jbmfilm.com.)
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tatiana Toro, Simons Laufer Mathematical Sciences Institute (SLMath) / MSRI
    Asamoah Nkwanta, Morgan State University
    Contacts:
    Jennifer Murawski, Simons Laufer Mathematical Sciences Institute (SLMath) / MSRI
    Uta Lorenzen, Simons Laufer Mathematical Sciences Institute (SLMath) / MSRI
    George Paul Csicsery, Zala Films
    Panelists:
    George Paul Csicsery, Zala Films
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
    AWM Mentoring Lunch

    400, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Darla Kremer, Association for Women in Mathematics
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    ASL Invited Address

    Organizers:
    David Reed Solomon, University of Connecticut
    Extending Borel's Conjecture from Measure to Dimension
    2A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Theodore Allen Slaman*, University of California, Berkeley
    (1203--37041)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Applications and Generalizations of Zero Forcing, II

    Zero forcing is a graph coloring game developed to give an upper bound for the maximum nullity of a symmetric matrix that has its pattern of off-diagonal zeros determined by the graph. Variations of zero forcing emerged as tools for other problems in linear algebra and graph theory. Applications range from graph searching, control of quantum systems, recommender systems, and electric grid monitoring. This session explores new directions in this area and is connected to an AIM Research Community.
    3B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Mary Flagg, University of St. Thomas flaggm@stthom.edu
    Veronika Furst, Fort Lewis College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Pedagogical Practices in Math Circles and Other Non-Traditional, Informal, and Recreational Math Spaces, II

    Sessions on Math Circles often feature activity sharing. Here talks will emphasize key pedagogical practices in math circles that promote strong mathematical habits of mind and deepen students' mathematical identities. We have a particular interest in sharing practices and activities that promote the participation in math enrichment spaces by historically marginalized groups and students who have not developed a healthy math identity in their early years of schooling.
    3A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Amber Verser, Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics advNS@hampshire.edu
    Li-Mei Lim, Boston University
    Douglas O'Roark, Math Circles of Chicago

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applications of Algebraic Geometry, II

    In the last decade, tools from algebraic geometry have proven to be powerful in many applications. Areas of study such as algebraic vision, algebraic statistics, and data science, have enjoyed the benefits of this toolkit. Fueled by computational advances, the list of disciplines which have begun to use the technology of algebraic geometry is growing rapidly. Our session highlights recent progress of applied and computational algebraic geometers who build these interdisciplinary bridges.
    605, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Timothy Duff, University of Washington timduff@uw.edu
    Taylor Brysiewicz, University of Western Ontario
    Jessie Loucks-Tavitas, University of Washington
    Frank Sottile, Texas A&M University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applied and Computational Commutative Algebra, II

    Many recent breakthroughs in commutative algebra were made accessible with computational methods. In this session, we bring together commutative algebra researchers whose work includes an applied and computational aspect.
    607, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Eloísa Grifo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln grifo@unl.edu
    Branden Stone, Georgia Tech Research Institute

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Approximate Models of Fluid Motion, II

    In this special session, we explore approximate models for the complex behavior of fluid flow based on the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. Our focus lies on approximate models where nonlinearity, dispersion, and other effects are important. A diverse group of speakers will present recent theoretical, numerical, and experimental results based on linear, nonlinear, and nonlocal differential equation models.
    310, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anastassiya Semenova, University of Washington asemenov@uw.edu
    John D Carter, Seattle University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Categorical Generalizations of Conditionalization, II

    Our session aims to bring together diverse perspectives on extensions of Bayesian inference as a model for consensus building. Categorical reformulations of conditional probabilities empower richer explorations of phenomena arising when collections of \sigma-algebras and measures interact. Such approaches are employed to probe group decision making and human-AI interactions. We invite contributions across the spectrum, from theoretical formalisms to philosophical interpretations and applications
    Yakima 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Theodore V Theodosopoulos, Nueva School ttheodosopoulos@nuevaschool.org
    Owen Biesel, Southern Connecticut State University
    Colin McSwiggen, New York University
    Michael Titelbaum, University of Wisconsin -- Madison

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Combinatorial and Probabilistic Methods in Group Theory, II

    This special session will focus on recent developments in probabilistic, combinatorial and geometric group theory. Topics include random walks and probability measures on groups, growth and cogrowth, dynamical and geometric aspects of groups, groups arising from random processes in algebra and geometry, combinatorial and Burnside-type problems.Our aim is to bring together senior experts, early career mathematicians and graduate students to create a collaborative and diverse research atmosphere.
    Tahoma 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Be"eri Greenfeld, University of Washington beeri.greenfeld@gmail.com
    Gil Goffer, University of California at San Diego
    Tianyi Zheng, University of California San Diego

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Combinatorics and Graph Theory in Honor of Dr. Peter Johnson, II

    This special session honors Dr. Peter Johnson's contributions to the fields of graph theory and combinatorics, where he has conducted groundbreaking research, mentored, and inspired numerous scholars.
    Tahoma 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Alex Somto Arinze Alochukwu, Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Physics, Albany State University, USA alex.alochukwu@asurams.edu
    Fadekemi Janet Osaye, Alabama State University
    Michael Tait, Villanova

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Concordance and Cobordism in Low Dimensions, II

    Two $n$-manifolds are {\emph{cobordant}} if they cobound an $(n+1)$-dimensional manifold; two submanifolds $A,B\subset M^n$ are {\emph{concordant}} if they cobound a product inside the product $M\times I$. These two notions generalize typical equivalence relations such as {\emph{homeomorphic}} or {\emph{isotopic}}. Recent advancements, particularly in the realm of Floer homology, have significantly enhanced our understanding of cobordisms and concordances in low-dimensions.
    620, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ryan Stees, University of Virginia rs2sf@virginia.edu
    Abhishek Mallick, Rutgers University
    Maggie Miller, University of Texas at Austin

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Control Theory and Artificial Intelligence, II

    This session will feature talks on the links between control theory, optimal control, deep learning and artificial intelligence. This includes optimal control, two point boundary value problems and back propagation, geometric methods in control and Lie groups, methods for learning control and mechanical systems, and gradient methods on Lie groups and manifolds.This point of view, because it is built upon deep mathematical foundations, is well suited to having fundamental impacts on the field
    210, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anthony Michael Bloch, University of Michigan abloch@umich.edu
    Mohamed Ali Belabbas, University of Illinois

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Cryptography and Related Fields, II

    Cryptography is ripe with interdisciplinary research. This session aims to unite ongoing research in the mathematics of cryptography. Areas such as coding theory and number theory boast theoretical and practical applications that are especially significant to the effort to build a quantum-safe cyberspace. These areas have been sources for many of the hard problems (lattice reduction, elliptic curve isogeny, random matrix decoding, etc.) used in recently proposed post-quantum cryptosystems.
    Skagit 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ryann Cartor, Clemson University rcartor@clemson.edu
    Max Cartor, University of Louisville
    Angela Robinson, NIST

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Current Directions on Modular Forms: in Twenty Minutes Snippets, III

    Modular forms, functions possessing a large amount of symmetry are omnipresent in Number Theory and neighboring subjects. The goal of this special session is to provide experts to present to the mathematical community short talks about specific problems in which these functions play a role. The organizers will encourage thespeakers to aim their talks to a general mathematical audience.
    606, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Victor H Moll, Tulane University vhm@tulane.edu
    Olivia Beckwith, Tulane University
    Kalani Thalagoda, Tulane University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Ecological and Evolutionary Models in Biology and Epidemiology, II

    The session is focusing on investigation of how heterogeneity emerges across various developmental stages and spatial contexts, particularly in dynamic environments like those undergoing climate change, which shape ecological and evolutionary dynamics crucial for species survival, coexistence, and the outbreak of diseases.
    Skagit 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Yanyu Xiao, University of Cincinnati yanyu.xiao@uc.edu
    Yun Kang, Arizona State University
    Sabrina H Streipert, University of Pittsburgh

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Emerging Geometric and Topological Machine Learning Methods in Mathematical and Computational Oncology, I

    Single-cell technologies reveal tumor diversity by capturing genomic, proteomic, and metabolic data at the cellular level, augmented by spatial transcriptomics. Analysis of these high-dimensional datasets requires innovative mathematical approaches. This session explores how manifold geometry, topological data analysis, and machine learning uncover patterns in these datasets, improving understanding of tumor biology, and predicting disease progression and treatment outcomes.
    612, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Smita Krishnaswamy, Yale smita.krishnaswamy@yale.edu
    Dhananjay Bhaskar, Yale University
    Aarthi Venkat, Yale University
    Raul Rabadan, Columbia University
    Shmuel Weinberger, University of Chicago

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Extremal and Probabilistic Combinatorics, II

    Extremal combinatorics is the study of the maximum or minimum size of combinatorial objects with some desired property. Probabilistic combinatorics studies properties of combinatorial objects that hold almost surely as the size of the object grows. These related fields are central in combinatorics and have significant applications in other areas of mathematics, computer science, engineering and bioinformatics. This session features new results, tools and open problems in this area.
    Tahoma 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jd Nir, Oakland University jdnir@oakland.edu
    Lina Li, Iowa State University
    Ruth Luo, University of South Carolina

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Financial Mathematics, II

    Research in Financial Mathematics is continuously leading to the development of highly sophisticated mathematical tools and inspiring a tremendous amount of interactions across various areas of Mathematics. The purpose of this session is to provide a platform for the dissemination of cutting-edge research in the field of financial mathematics, control theory, and related areas, and to report on their recent advances. It also provides an invaluable educational opportunity for graduate students.
    205, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sixian Jin, California State University San Marcos sjin@csusm.edu

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Function Spaces and Their Applications, II

    This session will bring together experts on function spaces and operators that live on them to discuss recent work and future avenues of research in the field. Applications in other fields of mathematics and engineering will also be included.
    203, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Javad Mashreghi, Laval University javad.mashreghi@mat.ulaval.ca
    William Verreault, University of Toronto

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Generative AI for Improving Instructional Productivity, II

    This session will explore the practical applications of generative AI to improve productivity in postsecondary mathematics education. Colleagues will share their experiments, experiences, and insights, highlighting the impact of this technology on instructional activities, including content creation, assessment, and student support. The presentations may focus solely on productivity aspects of using generative AI, and may also include discussions of the impact on student learning.
    Chelan 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University alayontf@gvsu.edu
    Erich McAlister, Fort Lewis College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Geometric and Topological Combinatorics, II

    Geometric and topological combinatorics is a thriving and very active area of research that explores and deepens connections between geometric structures, combinatorial problems, and algebraic and topological tools. In this session, we will showcase recent progress on many old and new problems in the field. Potential topics include combinatorics of simplicial and polyhedral complexes, matroid theory, lattice polytopes, and Helly-type theorems, to name just a few.
    Tahoma 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Bennet Goeckner, University of San Diego bgoeckner@sandiego.edu
    Gaku Liu, University of Washington
    Isabella Novik, University of Washington

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Geometry and Machine Learning, II

    Innovative research is being done at the intersection of geometry and machine learning, enriching both fields. Methods and techniques from geometry are being used to better understand the mathematical foundations of machine learning, and new tools and techniques from machine learning are being used to shed light on questions in geometry. This session will support the growing community of researchers working at this intersection.
    613, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tingting Tang, San Diego State University ttang2@sdsu.edu
    Yang-Hui He, City, University of London
    Fabian Ruehle, Northeastern University
    Yaim Cooper, University of Notre Dame

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on History of Mathematics, III

    Papers presented in these sessions will be on the history of mathematics from ancient to modern times, based on research carried out in the last three years. Topics include internal mathematical developments, external analyses of such developments, biographical accounts, descriptions of developments within specific periods, special issues related to mathematics, and accounts of events that affected the evolution of mathematics.
    608, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Victor J Katz, University of Washington vkatz@udc.edu
    Deborah Kent, University of St. Andrews
    E.A. Hunter, University of Chicago
    Sloan Evans Despeaux, Western Carolina University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Homotopy Theory, III

    Homotopy theory, the study of homotopy-coherent objects, is at the intersection of many different mathematical worlds, with deep connections to algebraic topology, algebraic geometry, number theory and category theory. This special session features talks on the various modern developments within homotopy theory.
    617, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    XiaoLin Danny Shi, University of Washington dannyshi@uw.edu
    Morgan Peck Opie, UCLA
    Piotr Pstragowski, Harvard University
    Kirsten Wickelgren, Duke University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on L-functions, Automorphic Forms, and Their Applications, II

    In recent years, analytic methods have been employed with great success to many problems of great importance in number theory, including subconvexity of L-functions, bounds for character sums, and the Langlands program. The purpose of this session is to report on some progress concerning these and related areas. This session will involve a mix of junior and senior researchers from around the country, will the goal of introducing new techniques and fostering future collaborations. 
    604, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sheng-Chi Liu, Washington State University scliu@math.wsu.edu
    Riad Masri, Texas A&M University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematics and Sports, I

    Availability of play-by-play statistics, video-based spatial data, and wearable technology data have led to innovative sports analytics studies. This research is impacting all aspects of sports: strategy, player evaluation, ranking methods, marketing, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, preliminary reports, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome in this session. Projects accessible to or involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.
    213, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Filippo Posta, Phoenix College filippo.posta@estrellamountain.edu
    Amanda Harsy, Lewis University
    Paul W von Dohlen, William Paterson University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematics at Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), II

    Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) include national labs and contractors for government agencies such as the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. Their profile and culture lies between academia and the corporate world. In this session, researchers and administrators from will talk about some of the mathematical work done at FFRDCs. There will be a panel at the end to discuss career opportunities.
    Tahoma 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Wayne Raskind, Center for Communications Research, Princeton wraskind@gmail.com
    Carol Woodward, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on New Directions in Harmonic Analysis, II

    This session will focus on recent developments in harmonic analysis and related areas, with an emphasis on work by early-career researchers. Concentrating on the findings of junior analysts, the material presented will showcase the fresh perspectives of developing talent in new and ongoing directions related to harmonic analysis. Moreover, this session will present an inclusive environment to connect aspiring analysts to the broader mathematical community.
    304, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Cody B. Stockdale, Clemson University cbstock@clemson.edu
    Andrew Walton Green, Washington University In St. Louis
    Brandon Sweeting, University of Alabama
    Nathan A. Wagner, Brown University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Nonlinear Algebraic Methods in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, II

    Analytical methods based on linear algebra are ubiquitous primarily due to their computational feasibility, but real-world data is typically nonlinear. Nonlinear algebraic data analysis is emerging as a distinct research field from several separate efforts - tensor analysis, numerical algebraic geometry, (deep) neural networks, and invariant theory. The application of nonlinear algebra to AI and machine learning has the potential to more accurately and faithfully model complex, real-world data.
    Skagit 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jonathan Gryak, Queens College, City University of New York gryakj@gmail.com

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Operators in Inverse Problems, Differential Equations, and Machine Learning, II

    Operators in mathematical modeling are fundamental in explaining physical phenomena and predictions. We focus on inverse problems in PDEs and on the analysis of operators using numerical methods and data-driven tools. Speakers have developed novel approaches to solving PDEs, inverse problems, and problems from machine learning. Researchers at the beginning stage of their careers will also be able to interact with more established mathematicians.
    201, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Doosung Choi, Louisiana State University dchoi@lsu.edu
    Hyun-Kyoung Kwon, University at Albany
    Mikyoung Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Quaternions, II

    Presentations on the mathematics, applications, and historical development of quaternions. Algebraists, geometers, physicists, and other scientists actively conduct research involving quaternions. In addition to their interesting mathematical properties, quaternions have many applications: in classical mechanics to describe rotations; in Maxwell's development of E&M. Applications of quaternions are found in aeronautical engineering, computer graphics, molecular biology, and quantum field theory.
    602, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Chris McCarthy, BMCC, City University of New York mccarthyBMCC@yahoo.com
    Johannes Familton, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
    Terrence Richard Blackman, Medgar Evers College CUNY

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Developments in PDEs and Related Areas, II

    Partial differential equations are one of the major topics in mathematics. This session will highlight recent advances, including dispersive and elliptic equations, wave turbulence, numerical methods, and computer-assisted proof. We are committed to creating a vibrant and inclusive environment for scholars at different career stages and with diverse backgrounds. We aim to bridge theoretical mathematics with practical applications, engaging a wide audience and inspiring future mathematicians.
    303, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Weinan Wang, University of Oklahoma ww@ou.edu
    Zongyuan Li, City University of Hong Kong
    Xueying Yu, Oregon State University
    Zhiyuan Zhang, Northeastern University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Take the i Road: Welcoming Complex Numbers and Viewpoints Across the Undergraduate Curriculum, II

    Speakers will talk about using complex numbers and viewpoints to enrich undergraduate courses. Complex topics offer rich history, inviting visualizations, engaging extensions of ideas students have encountered, and opportunities for open-ended inquiry. Complex numbers, while crucial in the development of advanced mathematics, are not central to many undergraduate programs. This session should provide strategies, whether in modular units or full courses, to excite students and open new doors.
    Chelan 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Paul Zorn, St Olaf College zorn@stolaf.edu
    Bob Sachs, George Mason University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on The Convergence of AI, Math, and Statistics in Biomedical Research, II

    This session focuses on the role of mathematical, statistical, and AI methods in advancing our understanding of drug delivery, clinical trial analysis, and cancer classification. Speakers will discuss novel simulation approaches and data analysis techniques for drug release profiles, targeting strategies, and implementation of clinical trials. These tools along with AI can be leveraged to interpret complex biomedical data and shape the future of medical research and treatment strategies.
    Skagit 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Fnu Nisha, Clemson University nisha120226@gmail.com
    Keisha Cook, Clemson University

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Using 3D-Printed and Other Digitally-Fabricated Objects in the Mathematics Classroom, II

    In recent years, it has become easier and more affordable to 3D print objects for use in teaching and learning mathematics. Other technologies including thermoforming, CNC routing, and laser cutting have also become more accessible. Through this session, we aim to bring together educators who are interested in exploring how digitally fabricated tactile objects are being used to enhance learning in college-level mathematics classes.
    Chelan 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Shelby Stanhope, U.S. Air Force Academy shelby.stanhope@afacademy.af.edu
    Paul E. Seeburger, Monroe Community College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Vector Bundles and Quantization, II

    Moduli spaces of vector bundles, with or without additional decorations, over complex varieties are a major source of classical integrable systems. These include various classical integrable systems related to the KdV hierarchy as well as Hitchin systems. The algebraic nature of these spaces goes hand in hand with the existence of quantizations of these systems that can be interpreted algebraically or combinatorially, such as the approaches of Beilinson-Drinfeld and topological recursion.
    614, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Laura P. Schaposnik, University of Illinois at Chicago schapos@uic.edu
    Steven Rayan, University of Saskatchewan
    Ruxandra Moraru, University of Waterloo

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS-ASA-SIAM Special Session on Mathematics of Deep Learning: A High-Dimensional Probability Perspective, II

    This session explores the intersection of deep learning theory and high-dimensional probability. Experts from diverse fields will discuss (i) how probability theory provides new understanding to modern machine learning systems, e.g., precise asymptotics of model performance via random matrix theory and SDE description of training dynamics, and (ii) how deep learning introduces new problems in probability theory, such as the study of nonlinear random matrix ensembles and universality.
    Yakima 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Zhichao Wang, University of California San Diego zhw036@ucsd.edu
    Denny Wu, New York University
    Ioana Dumitriu, University of California San Diego
    Tony Chiang, Pacific Northwest National Lab

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AMS-MAA-SIAM Special Session on Research in Mathematics by Undergraduates and Students in Post-Baccalaureate Programs, IV

    The session will offer students the opportunity to present research that they have done as part of an NSF-REU, MAA NREUP, or similar program, or on a research project done at their home institution. Abstracts from all areas of mathematics and mathematical sciences will be considered.
    Skagit 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Darren A. Narayan, Rochester Institute of Technology dansma@rit.edu
    Mark Daniel Ward, Purdue University
    Patricia Cahn, Smith College
    Khang Duc Tran, California State University, Fresno

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Preserver Problems, II

    This session concerns the study of maps on matrices or operators which preserve some interesting quantity, structure, or relation. Such problems have a long history, and arise naturally in both pure and applied mathematics. This special session will bring a variety of researchers together to share their recent results, methods, and problems.
    211, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Edward Poon, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University edward.poon@erau.edu
    Chi-Kwong Li, College of William and Mary
    Sushil Singla, Phd Student, Department of Mathematics, Shiv Nadar University Delhi NCR."
    Bojan Kuzma, University of Primorska

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Randomness in Numerical Linear Algebra, II

    In recent years, randomness and probability theory have started to play an increasing role in numerical linear algebra. From sketching to produce preconditioners for least squares problems to randomized perturbations to separate pseudospectra and compute eigenvalues of nonsymmetric matrices, the basic algorithms of numerical linear algebra are being modified. In this minisymposium we will explore some of these new ideas and their analysis.
    204, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anne Greenbaum, University of Washington greenbau@uw.edu
    Heather Denise Wilber, University of Washington

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) 4B: Formalization in the Lean Theorem Prover

    This Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) will train mathematicians in the use of proof assistants, namely the Lean Interactive Theorem Prover. No prior familiarity with this technology will be assumed.
    Willow A, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Alex Kontorovich, Rutgers University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Special Session on SIAM Minisymposium on Geometric Mechanics Formulations and Structure-Preserving Discretizations for Models of Physical Systems

    2B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Chris Eldred, Sandia National Laboratories celdred@sandia.gov
    Jonas Actor, Sandia National Laboratories
    Anthony Gruber, Sandia National Laboratories
    Brian Tran, Los Alamos National Laboratories

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    SIGMAA Special Session on Mathematics and the Arts, IV

    This session hosts talks from artists who use mathematical techniques or draw inspiration from mathematical ideas, and from mathematicians who study art.
    609, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anil Venkatesh, Adelphi University avenkatesh@adelphi.edu
    Doug Norton, Villanova University
    Karl M Kattchee, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    SIGMAA Special Session on Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology, III

    This session is dedicated to undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology. This session highlights research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology. The session also addresses the logistics of starting and maintaining an undergraduate research program in this area.
    610, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Timothy D Comar, Benedictine University timcomar@gmail.com
    Anne E. Yust, University of Pittsburgh
    Erin N Bodine, Rhodes College

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    SLMath (MSRI) Special Session on at the Intersection of Harmonic Analysis and Fractal Geometry, II

    We explore emerging links in Harmonic Analysis and Geometric Measure Theory with applications to Ergodic Theory, Dynamical Systems, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. Different tools and fundamental questions exist in the communities but they unite around the following themes: Investigating finite point configurations; properties of projections; Combinatorial problems in fractal geometry (distance and direction sets, arithmetic progressions, Kakeya-type sets).
    611, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Krystal Taylor, The Ohio State University taylor.2952@osu.edu
    Samantha Sandberg, The Ohio State University
    Alex McDonald, The Ohio State University
    Scott Zimmerman, The Ohio State University At Marion

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
    JMM Workshop on Reimagining Exams to Focus on Meaningful Learning and Disrupt the Dominant Grade-Focused Culture

    Most math courses use homework, quizzes, and exams to monitor students' learning. Preoccupied with earning good -- or just passing -- grades, students' engagement often becomes distorted. Grades also function significantly to bar advancement in mathematics and other fields. This workshop will engage participants in exploring specific alternatives to modal approaches to assessment and grading that recenter mathematics teaching on meaningful mathematics learning.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Hyman Bass, University of Michigan
    Deborah Loewenberg Ball, University of Michigan

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
    TPSE Panel: Aligning Mathematics Options with Students' Aspirations in Grades 11-14

    States are rethinking math options in the transition years between high school and higher education to ensure that students can access courses aligned with their aspirations. This session will explore the different ways states are answering tricky questions: When is the right time to allow different students to take different courses (statistics, quantitative reasoning, data science)? How can that be done equitably, based on students' interests not on preconceived notions about their potential?
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    David T Kung, Charles A. Dana Center - UT-Austin
    Ted Coe, VP for Content Advocacy -- Mathematics, Northwest Evaluation Association
    Joleigh Honey, Past-President, Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics (ASSM)
    Scott Wolpert, University of Maryland
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    AMS Business Meeting

    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Boris Hasselblatt, Tufts University Boris.Hasselblatt@tufts.edu
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics, II

    The AWM workshop showcases recent work by two of the AWM Research Networks: Women in Operator Algebras organized by Maria Grazia and Sarah Reznikov, and Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics organized by Carolyn Abbott and Rachel Skipper. A juried Poster Session for graduate students, the AWM Panel: The Intersection of AI and Women+ in the Mathematical Sciences entitled, and a Mentoring Luncheon are organized by the AWM JMM organizing committee.
    4C-1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Carolyn Abbott, Brandeis University carolynabbott@brandeis.edu
    Rachel Skipper, University of Utah

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 1:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Operator Algebras, II

    The AWM workshop showcases recent work by two of the AWM Research Networks: Women in Operator Algebras organized by Maria Grazia and Sarah Reznikov, and Women in Groups, Geometry, and Dynamics organized by Carolyn Abbott and Rachel Skipper. A juried Poster Session for graduate students, the AWM Panel: The Intersection of AI and Women+ in the Mathematical Sciences entitled, and a Mentoring Luncheon are organized by the AWM JMM organizing committee.
    619, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Maria Grazia Viola, Lakehead University mviola@lakeheadu.ca
    Sarah Reznikoff, Virginia Tech

  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
    JMM Panel on Fields of Success: Math Alliance Scholars Tell their Stories from Undergraduate to Graduate and Beyond.

    In this panel Math Alliance Scholar doctorates discuss how the Math Alliance and focused mentoring has influenced their path to their PhD as well as their careers. The Math Alliance is a community of faculty and students striving to increase the number of quantitative science doctorates among traditionally underrepresented groups. There are over 2,500 past and present Alliance Scholars, over 70% of them from US minority groups that have been historically underrepresented.
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Theresa Martines, University of Texas, Austin
    David Goldberg, Math Alliance/Purdue University
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 2:15 p.m.-3:20 p.m.
    MAA-AMS-SIAM Gerald and Judith Porter Public Lecture

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Title to be announced
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Ravi Vakil*, Stanford University
    (1203--36493)
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    JMM Workshop: High School Mathematics Reimagined

    In this session, participants will examine a framework based on the newest publication from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) for reimagining high school mathematics to make it more relevant, useful, and engaging for students.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Latrenda Knighten, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    TPSE Panel: Tools for Supporting Conversations About Teaching

    What are the challenges encountered when attempting to center conversations about active learning on the mathematics being prioritized, how students engage with it, and what is being learned? Faculty members from the Teaching for PROWESS project share tools that can be used in various settings to focus conversations about teaching on particular aspects of students' experiences.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nancy J Sattler, Terra State Community College
    Scott Andrew Wolpert, University of Maryland and TPSE Math
  • Saturday January 11, 2025, 3:20 p.m.-4:25 p.m.
    AMS Invited Address

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Uncertainty principles in quantum chaos
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Semyon Dyatlov*, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    (1203-81-36448)