Joint Mathematics Meetings Program by Day

Current as of Wednesday, July 24, 2024 03:30:04

 
 

2025 Joint Mathematics Meetings (JMM 2025)

  • Seattle Convention Center and the Sheraton Grand Seattle, Seattle, WA
  • January 8-11, 2025 (Wednesday - Saturday)
  • Meeting #1203

Associate Secretary for the AMS Scientific Program:

Brian D. Boe, brian@math.uga.edu

 

Please note room assignments are subject to change right up until the meeting occurs. The program published here is continually updated and may be more current than the printed program.

Wednesday January 8, 2025

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Joint Meetings Registration

    Atrium Lobby, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Employment Center

    Grand Ballroom AB, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Hannah Ortiz, American Mathematical Society
    Kayla M. Roach, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Math Circles for Makers, Creators, and Artists, I

    Math is a human endeavor that provides many opportunities for artistic expression. This session will showcase dynamic and interactive presentations of math circle activities where students, educators, and community members make, create, or perform to explore mathematics. Beyond being great for math circles, these activities can also be fun ways to enrich your mathematics classes.
    3B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nick Rauh, Seattle Universal Math Museum nmrauh@gmail.com
    Tom G. Stojsavljevic, Beloit College
    Gabriella A. Pinter, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
    Jeffrey Musyt, Slippery Rock University
    A. Gwinn Royal, Ivy Tech Community College
    Lauren L Rose, Bard College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on 35th Anniversary of AI and Math, I

    Celebrating the founding in 1990 of the biennial Int'l Symp. on AI and Math (ISAIM), selected past speakers, chairs, and colleagues will present recent research, with a particular emphasis on the foundations of AI and mathematical methods. Participants from a variety of disciplines will provide a unique forum for scientific exchange to foster new areas of applied mathematics and strengthen the scientific underpinnings of AI.
    Skagit 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Martin Charles Golumbic, University of Haifa golumbic@cs.haifa.ac.il
    Frederick Hoffman, Florida Atlantic University
    Contacts:
    Maria Provost, Florida Atlantic University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Advancements in Generative Artificial Intelligence for Data Analysis: From Creativity to Innovation, I

    Generative AI has emerged as a transformative field with profound implications for creativity, innovation, and human-machine interaction. This proposed special session aims to explore the latest developments, challenges, and opportunities in generative AI across diverse domains, ranging from art and design to healthcare and engineering. The session seeks to showcase cutting-edge research, foster interdisciplinary collaboration, and inspire new avenues for innovation.
    612, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Yin-Tzer Shih, National Chung Hsing University yintzer_shih@email.nchu.edu.tw

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Advances in Function Theoretic Operator Theory, I

    This session aims to attract both seasoned and early-career researchers to present state-of-the-art techniques and results at the intersection of complex analysis and operator theory. Topics considered will include: function spaces and their operators, reproducing kernel methods and applications (including machine learning and data science), and the interaction of operator theory and several complex variables.
    205, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Christopher Felder, Indiana University Bloomington cfelder@iu.edu
    Raymond Cheng, Old Dominion University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Algebraic Statistics in Our Changing World, I

    Algebra plays an important role in tackling statistical challenges, due to underlying mathematical structures that arise in modeling and inference. As a result, the field of algebraic statistics has emerged. This session pairs domain-specific expertise and developments in algebraic statistics to form interdisciplinary connections for addressing challenges in our changing world. The session aims to identify areas for progress within these applications with a focus on AI and machine learning.
    Yakima 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Yulia Alexandr, University of California, Los Angeles yulia@math.ucla.edu
    Elizabeth Gross, University of Hawai`i at Manoa
    Jose Israel Rodriguez, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Teresa Yu, University of Michigan

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applied Category Theory, I

    Applied category theory (ACT) as a burgeoning discipline has gathered interest and attention in a wide range of areas including quantum physics, epidemiological modeling, database theory, artificial intelligence, and game theory. Research and development efforts in ACT involve four major aspects: theory, application, programming tools, and communication. This session will feature talks on all these aspects of ACT, geared towards a broad audience, including students and practitioners.
    Yakima 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Priyaa Varshinee, Topos Institute priyaavarshinee@gmail.com
    Evan Patterson, Topos Institute
    Nelson Niu, University of Washington
    Contacts:
    Priyaa Varshinee, Topos Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Arithmetic Dynamics of Single and Multiple Maps, I

    Arithmetic dynamics is the study of algebraic and number theoretic phenomena arising from self-maps of algebraic varieties. For a morphism or rational self-map f : X --> X of a variety defined over a field K --- which could be a number field, a function field, a p-adic field, or a finite field --- many algebraic and number-theoretic questions arise about natural dynamical structures connected to the orbits of points in X(K) under the action of f.
    604, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Robert L Benedetto, Amherst College rlbenedetto@amherst.edu
    Xander Faber, IDA / Center For Computing Sciences
    Bella Tobin, Agnes Scott College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Business, Entrepreneurship, Government, Industry and Nonprofit (BEGIN) Career Development within Mathematics Programs, I

    Skills training, experiential learning, career readiness, employer relations, and life design activities are important, but often overlooked, components in launching a successful BEGIN career. This session brings together BEGIN employers and mathematical scientists along with university career development experts and mathematics programs staff to discuss how synergies between these groups can enhance emerging mathematicians' knowledge about, and preparation for, careers in BEGIN organizations.
    Skagit 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tony Macula, American Mathematical Society ajm@ams.org
    Contacts:
    Tony Macula, American Mathematical Society

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Coding Theory for Modern Applications, I

    This session brings together mathematics, electrical engineering, and computer science researchers from academia and industry to share cutting-edge work on the fundamentals and classic and modern applications of coding theory.We expect results from some of the most current research on the fundamentals of coding theory and the development of families of codes that satisfy a specific property, such as reliable and secure communication and storage.
    605, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Hiram H. Lopez, Virginia Tech hhlopez@vt.edu
    Allison Beemer, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
    Eduardo Camps Moreno, Virginia Tech
    Rafael D'Oliveira, Clemson University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Cohomology of Arithmetic Groups, Mapping Class Groups, and Moduli Spaces, I

    This session will bring together experts in two fields: geometric group theorists studying arithmetic groups and mapping class groups, and algebraic geometers studying the geometry of moduli spaces. These communities often study the same objects from different perspectives, and our goal is to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration. A particular focus will be on patterns in their unstable cohomology that arise from the study of Steinberg modules, tropicalizations, and weight filtrations.
    614, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Andrew Putman, University of Notre Dame andyp@nd.edu
    Sam Payne, UT Austin

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Conservation Laws and Boundary Value Problems in far from Equilibrium Dynamics, I

    Far from equilibrium dynamics controls many processes in nature and technology, from supernovae to fusion, and is a challenge to study in theory, simulations, data science. Analytically, one needs to solve the conservation laws and singular boundary value problems. Numerical and data modeling impose high demands on the accuracy and scale of computations. The Workshop builds upon recent successes in capturing far from equilibrium dynamics, and reports solutions for fundamentals and applications.
    303, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Snezhana I. Abarzhi, California Institute of Technology snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com
    James G Glimm, State University of New York at Stony Brook

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Dynamical Systems Modeling Approaches Across Multiple Biological Scales, I

    Biological interactions occur in a myriad of different temporal, spatial, and ecological scales. Explicit consideration of such multiscale dynamics has led to a much deeper understanding of ecological and evolutionary phenomena, but has left even more unanswered questions. In this session, we wish to explore the scientific advances that have taken place in modeling biological dynamics that occur on multiple natural scales.
    Skagit 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Chris M. Heggerud, University of California, Davis cmheggerud@ucdavis.edu
    Daniel Brendan Cooney, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    Chadi M Saad-Roy, University of California, Berkeley

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Exploring Dynamics and Bifurcation Analysis of Discrete Dynamical Systems in Mathematical Biology, I

    This proposed special session aims to explore the intersection of discrete dynamical systems and mathematical biology, covering topics like plant-herbivore interactions, predator-prey models, epidemiological dynamics, and more. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, we seek to understand the complex dynamics of biological systems and their implications for artificial intelligence and bio-inspired computing.
    310, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Arzu Bilgin, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University arzu.bilgin@erdogan.edu.tr
    Toufik Khyat, Rider University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Generalized Derivatives: Analysis on Time Scales, Fractional Calculus, Difference Equations, and Others, I

    Generalized derivatives represents a broad theory beyond classical analysis. Difference equations and q-calculus are crucial to important physical models. Time scales calculus is useful when an underlying process contains hybrid measurements. Some types of internal damping can be modeled with fractional or conformable calculus. This special session showcases recent advancements in the areas described above. This includes a broad overview of recent work, theory, modeling, and computations.
    304, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nick Wintz, Lindenwood University nwintz@lindenwood.edu
    Tom Cuchta, Marshall University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Harnessing the Power of Mathematical Models to Understand Population Dynamics, Ecology, and Evolution, I

    Our planet faces a web of environmental threats - habitat loss, invasive species, climate change, and emerging diseases. Yet, scientific inquiry offers a powerful weapon in this fight. This session brings together researchers from theoretical and mathematical ecology, evolutionary ecology, mathematical epidemiology, and related fields. By wielding the power of mathematical models, we aim to illuminate the complexities of these challenges and chart a course toward a more sustainable future.
    Skagit 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Lale Asik, University of the Incarnate Word asik@uiwtx.edu

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Knots, 3-manifolds, and Their Invariants, I

    We will study knots, the properties of various knot models and methods of presentation, knot polynomials and homology theories, and relevant influences from areas ranging from contact geometry to probability theory and combinatorics. Many talks will be accessible to undergraduates.
    617, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Margaret I Doig, Creighton University margaretdoig@creighton.edu
    Kate Petersen, University of Minnesota Duluth
    Christine Ruey Shan Lee, Texas State University
    Shelly Harvey, Rice University
    Moshe Cohen, State University of New York At New Paltz

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Local-to-Global in Apollonian Circle Packings and Beyond, I

    The last decades have seen the discovery of new phenomena in local-to-global questions in thin group and semigroup orbits, and powerful results using analytic techniques, but a gap remains. Such orbits arise in a surprising diversity of areas, including polygonal billiards, continued fractions, closed geodesics, and Apollonian circle packings. Each of these topics, in turn, has fascinating connections to other areas.
    602, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Elena Fuchs, UC Davis efuchs@math.ucdavis.edu
    Katherine E. Stange, University of Colorado, Boulder
    Catherine Maria Hsu, Swarthmore College
    Summer Haag, University of Colorado, Boulder

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematical Frontiers of Data Science for National Security, I

    This special session will highlight the role of mathematics in US government operations, policy making, and research. It aims to demonstrate how mathematics and AI are employed in unique government contexts, including the handling of diverse data types, large datasets, and regulatory compliance. The session will provide insights into government-based mathematical careers and research collaborations, targeting a broad audience from students to researchers.
    Tahoma 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    R W R Darling, National Security Agency rwdarli@nsa.gov
    Marcus J Bishop, National Security Agency
    John A Emanuello, National Security Agency

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematics of Knowledge Graphs: Theory and Application, I

    The increasing prevalence of knowledge graphs in AI has posed mathematical questions such as: when are other combinatorial structures, beyond (simple, undirected) graphs, more effective representations of knowledge systems? What algorithmic and computational challenges do knowledge graph-based methodologies present -- and how can mathematics help overcome these? We aim to highlight research addressing these and related questions, bringing together those in academia, industry and government.
    Tahoma 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sinan G Aksoy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory sinanaksoy90@gmail.com
    Bill Kay, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Patrick Mackey, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Modeling Natural Resources, I

    This session addresses mathematical modeling of natural resources including soil, air, water, fisheries, wildlife, and forestry systems, as well as threatened and endangered species, ecological implications of climate change, community dynamics, ecological invasions and range limits, and disease vectors. Mathematical modeling encompasses a wide range of research areas and involves data science and artificial intelligence. MSC's include 34, 35, 37, 39, 49, 62, 65, 90, 91, and 92.
    Skagit 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Catherine A Roberts, College of the Holy Cross croberts@holycross.edu
    Shandelle Henson, Andrews University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on New Trends in Lie Theory and Mathematical Physics, I

    Recent advances in the geometric Langlands program and its connections to supersymmetric quantum field theory have spurred a new wave of physical applications of Lie theory. At the same time, Lie theory is also emerging as powerful paradigm in the mathematical study of quantum computating. The goal of this special session is to discuss these emerging trends with special emphasis on logarithmic conformal field theory, quantum computational complexity, and supersymmetric quantum mechanics.
    606, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Marco Aldi, Virginia Commonwealth University maldi2@vcu.edu
    Juan Villarreal, University of Bath

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Partition Theory and $q$-Series, I

    Theory of partitions (elementary, analytic, and combinatorial) in all aspects: q-series, hypergeometric functions, and algebraic combinatorics; related objects including but not limited to compositions, overpartitions, and plane partitions; and aspects of research tools useful in the field such as relevant results on classes of modular forms, particularly eta-quotients, and proof techniques for generating functions.
    Tahoma 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    William Jonathan Keith, Michigan Technological University wjkeith@mtu.edu
    Dennis Eichhorn, University of California, Irvine
    Brandt Kronholm, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Polymath Jr REU Student Research Session, I

    The Polymath Jr REU program consists of research projects in a variety of mathematical topics and runs in the spirit of the Polymath Project. Each project is mentored by an active researcher with experience in undergraduate mentoring, and assisted by graduate students and post-docs who gain research in designing research programs. This session presents some recent work of participants.
    Chelan 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Zhanar Berikkyzy, Fairfeld University
    Steven Joel Miller, Williams College sjm1@williams.edu
    Adam Sheffer, Baruch College, CUNY

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Advancements in the Numerical Analysis of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, I

    This special session will highlight and address some of the current challenges for solving nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) numerically. PDEs have wide-ranging applications, and numerical methods remain an important tool for the understanding of solutions to PDEs. The emphasis in this session will be on theoretical results and computational results for reliably approximating solutions to nonlinear problems that are at the forefront of numerical PDEs.
    213, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Thomas Lee Lewis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro tllewis3@uncg.edu
    Yi Zhang, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Developments in Regularization Methods for Nonlinear Inverse Problems, I

    This special session will present cutting-edge advancements in regularization methodologies specifically designed for nonlinear inverse problems. These encompass parameter identification in partial differential equations, image registration, the integration of machine learning and deep learning techniques, neural networks, stochastic approximation methods, geological and financial modeling, and elasticity imaging, focusing on their diverse medical applications, among other pertinent topics.
    210, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Akhtar A. Khan, Rochester Institute of Technology aaksma@rit.edu
    Otmar Scherzer, University of Vienna
    Bernd Hofmann, Chemnitz University of Technology

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Research from the Graduate Research Workshop in Combinatorics, I

    The Graduate Research Workshop in Combinatorics (GRWC) is an intensive 2-week summer research workshop, with the goal of engaging in original research while also building the research networks of participating graduate students and postdocs. This special session will include an overview talk on the GRWC history and format, with the remaining talks delivered by prior participants on research started during a recent iteration of the GRWC.
    Tahoma 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Puck Rombach, University of Vermont puck.rombach@uvm.edu
    Steve Butler, Iowa State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Several Complex Variables, Partial Differential Equations, and CR Geometry, I

    Several complex variables exhibits deep interactions with various mathematical fields, in particular with Partial Differential Equations and CR Geometry. This workshop is focused on recent developments in these three subject areas. As such, we bring together a group of senior and junior experts to present their recent research as well as to discuss open problems in these areas.
    201, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jiri Lebl, Oklahoma State University lebl@okstate.edu
    Sean N. Curry, Oklahoma State University
    Anne-Katrin Gallagher, Gallagher Tool & Instrument, Redmond, WA

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Spectral Theory of Ergodic Operators and Related Models, I

    608, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Matthew Powell, Georgia Institute of Technology powell@math.gatech.edu
    Svetlana Jitomirskaya, University of California, Berkeley
    Netanel Levi, UC Irvine
    Contacts:
    Matthew Powell, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Theoretical and Numerical Aspects of Fractional and Nonlocal Models, I

    Nonlocal models have attracted interest using integral and integro-differential operators instead of differential operators. They require less regularity for the input functions and capture multiple scales of interaction, giving more flexibility to model physical phenomena.Peridynamics uses nonlocal operators to model deformations. Fractional derivatives are employed to describe viscoelasticity and phase transitions. Nonlocal models are studied with numerical methods and machine learning.
    203, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nicole Buczkowski, Worcester Polytechnic Institute nbuczkowski@wpi.edu
    Animesh Biswas, University of Nebraska Lincoln
    Qiao Zhuang, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological Data Analysis: Theory and Applications, I

    The field of topological data analysis (TDA) seeks to apply some of the tools of algebraic topology, especially the homology of chain complexes, to infer geometric structures and features in large datasets. Applications are found in shape and image analysis, material science, robotics, social network analysis, and climate and environmental science. At the same time, a robust theory of TDA is being developed with the help of category theory and representation theory.
    620, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Shaun Van Ault, Valdosta State University svault@valdosta.edu
    Jose A. Velez-Marulanda, Valdosta State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological Machine Learning, I

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) are cornerstones of recent progress in science, supported by insights and advancements in mathematics. This session focuses on topology in AI/ML, which is well-suited to dealing with real and noisy data due to its flexibility to perturbations and ability to model complex interactions. Emphasis is on the use of topological thinking to enable creation of novel models, providing interesting insights into applications impacted by these advances.
    607, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Stephen J Young, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory stephen.young@pnnl.gov
    Brett Jefferson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Branden Stone, Georgia Tech Research Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological, Algebraic, and Geometric Methods for Safe, Robust, and Explainable Machine Learning, I

    This special session showcases research that applies ideas from topology, algebra, and geometry to the goal of increasing the safety, robustness, or explainability of modern machine learning. We will feature research that (i) proposes novel approaches to machine learning by drawing on tools and ideas from topology, algebra, and geometry or (ii) uses mathematics to illuminate how and why existing state-of-the-art models work as well as they do in some situations but fail in others.
    613, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Henry Kvinge, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory henry.kvinge@pnnl.gov
    Tegan Emerson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Tim Doster, Pacific Northwest National Lab
    Scott Mahan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Sarah McGuire, Michigan State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS-SIMIODE Special Session on Modeling Matters in Teaching and Learning Differential Equations, I

    Modeling matters in teaching and learning differential equations in two ways (1) modeling should shape the course matter and (2) modeling matters to students to show the rationale for studying differential equations. We seek talks in which both matters are considered, namely, demonstrate the modeling matter or content used to motivate learning and showing teachers that it matters just how they bring students to the mathematics of differential equations by learning in context.
    Chelan 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA BrianWinkel@simiode.org
    Kyle T Allaire, Worcester State University, Worcester MA USA
    Lisa Naples, Fairfield University, Fairfield CT USA
    Pushpi Paranamana, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame IN USA

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Mathematical Biology, I

    In recent years, there has been broad interest in applications of mathematics in biology and medicine. Different stochastic and deterministic models, and numerical and statistical approaches have been developed to study various fields of mathematical biology, such as ecology, immunology, epidemiology, and many more. This special session will highlight these new developments along with the diverse group of researchers who drive innovation. We will have an open lunch gathering open to all.
    4C-1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Hwayeon Ryu, Elon University hryu@elon.edu
    Christina Edholm, Scripps College
    Lihong Zhao, Virginia Tech
    Robyn Shuttleworth, Altos Labs
    Karin Leiderman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    CRM-PIMS-AARMS Special Session on Indigenous Voices in Mathematics, I

    This session will highlight the research of Indigenous mathematicians, showcasing the breadth and depth of their contributions across various mathematical disciplines. From theoretical research to practical applications and advancements in math education, Indigenous scholars bring a rich diversity of perspectives to mathematics.
    615, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Kamuela E. Yong, University of Hawaii West Oahu kamuela.yong@hawaii.edu

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Matrix Analysis and Applications, I

    The organizers are proposing an ILAS special session titled "Matrix Analysis and Applications" at JMM 2025. The aim is to stimulate research in matrix analysis and its applications. This session will serve as a platform for researcher from various backgrounds to showcase their discoveries. We are committed to encourage broad participation, welcoming graduate students, postdoc researchers, early career individuals, as well as well-established researchers, to attend and contribute to the session.
    211, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tin-Yau Tam, University of Nevada, Reno ttam@unr.edu
    Mohsen Aliabadi, University of California, San Diego
    Luyining Gan, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Strong Properties of Matrix Classes, I

    Since the mid 2000s there has been a flurry of work that studies various strong properties associated with spectral properties of matrices and their graphs or digraphs These strong properties have allowed significant progress in the study of related matrix invariants and led to nice connections with graph minors, and graph propagation procedures. These have given rise to new matrix and graph theoretic questions and results. This session will provide updates on this evolving area of mathematics.
    204, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Bryan L Shader, University of Wyoming bshader@uwyo.edu
    Minerva Catral, Xavier University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    MAA Special Session on Assessment Practices that Support Equity and Inclusion, I

    This session highlights techniques in assessment that support equity and inclusion. Recently, educators have seen how assessment methods can support students from diverse backgrounds while others are exclusionary. Talks in this session will explore assessments practices which support student learning especially those from historically underrepresented populations. Topics will range from policies related to placement and entrance exams to alternate grading and classroom policies.
    619, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Amanda Harsy Ramsay, Lewis University harsyram@lewisu.edu
    Heather Smith Blake, Davidson College
    Jessica Oshaughnessy, West Chester University
    Andrew C Lee, United States Military Academy
    Brittney Falahola, Stephen F. Austin State University
    Sheila Tabanli, Rutgers University -- New Brunswick.
    Contacts:
    Amanda Harsy Ramsay, Lewis University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Special Session on SIAM Minisymposium on Computational Advances in Solving the Electronic Structure Problem for Complex Materials

    2B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    James Chelikowsky, University of Texas jrc@utexas.edu
    Vikram Gavini, University of Michigan
    Jin Qian, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    SIGMAA Special Session on Mathematics and the Arts, I

    This session hosts talks from artists who use mathematical techniques or draw inspiration from mathematical ideas, and from mathematicians who study art.
    610, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Anil Venkatesh, Adelphi University avenkatesh@adelphi.edu
    Doug Norton, Villanova University
    Karl M Kattchee, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    SLMath (MSRI) Special Session on Metric Geometry and Topology, I

    This special session will focus on the relationship between global metric geometry and topology,including methods of Riemannian geometry as well as Alexandrov geometry and other singulargeometric spaces. We expect the variety of intersecting interests will stimulate discussion and promotecross-fertilization of ideas.
    611, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Christine M. Escher, Oregon State University escherc@oregonstate.edu
    Catherine Searle, Wichita State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    TPSE Contributed Paper Session on Transformation Models for Inclusive Student Experiences, I

    618, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ben Ford, Sonoma State University ben.ford@sonoma.edu
    Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University
    Abbe Herzig, Bard Prison Initiative
    Brigitte Lahme, Sonoma State University
    Luis Antonio Leyva, Vanderbilt-Peabody College
    Omayra Ortega, Sonoma State University
    Aris Winger, Georgia Gwinnett College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m.
    AMS Directors of Graduate Studies Focus Group

    For directors of graduate study, chairpersons, and others leading graduate mathematical sciences programs, this event provides a venue in which to share ideas and concerns surrounding the experience of graduate students. Those intending to participate are invited to email programs@ams.org by December 4, 2024 (subject line: DGS Focus Group) to be placed on the contact list for this event and to send any questions or topics they would like to be discussed.
    Grand Ballroom D, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Sarah Bryant, American Mathematical Society
    Tyler Kloefkorn, American Mathematical Society
    Contacts:
    Kayla M. Roach, American Mathematical Society
    Sarah Bryant, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    AMS Panel: Challenges and Opportunities in Peer Review

    Panelists will discuss the changing face of journal peer review in mathematics. Topics include: the increased difficulty of finding reviewers, whether the reward structure of academia is appropriate; plagiarism and unethical citation practices; the rise of formalization of proofs (using tools such as Lean); how important is journal peer review; to what extent is mathematics different from other disciplines; innovations in review practices.
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Mark C. Wilson, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Panelists:
    Igor Pak, University of California, Los Angeles
    Lance Fortnow, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    JMM Panel on The Use of AI tools to Aid Mathematics Research

    The recent surge in AI tools promises to upend the nature of mathematics research. With this in mind, we propose a panel comprising mathematicians and computer scientists/engineers, where they can talk about the questions/directions most pertinent to mathematics research, and perhaps help shape future AI tools for mathematics.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ayush Khaitan, Rutgers University
    Swarat Chaudhari, University of Texas at Austin
    Amitayush Thakur, University of Texas at Austin
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    MAA Workshop: Supercharging Math Instruction: A Practical Guide to Generative AI Applications

    Explore the integration of generative AI in math education, focusing on practical applications that enhance curriculum design and problem-solving. This hands-on workshop will cover the use of AI tools, such as ChatGPT, for creating dynamic assignments and facilitating an inclusive, engaging learning environment. Participants will develop AI-augmented educational materials, discuss the ethical dimensions of AI in the classroom and gain insights into preparing students for the AI-influenced future
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Lewis D. Ludwig, Denison University
    Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
    Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) 5A: Quantum-Accelerated Supercomputing for the Mathematics Classroom

    Quantum computing and artificial intelligence are cutting-edge technologies poised to accelerate high performance supercomputing. Their impact is significantly boosted by capabilities of multi-GPU systems. This interactive tutorial introduces attendees to the fundamentals of quantum computing through a mathematical lens. Attendees will take away materials to integrate quantum-accelerated supercomputing examples into various mathematics courses, including linear algebra and optimization.
    Willow A, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Monica VanDieren, NVIDIA
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
    Association for Symbolic Logic Tutorial:

    2A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sergei Starchenko, University of Notre Dame
    David Reed Solomon, University of Connecticut
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 9:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
    AMS Directors of Undergraduate Studies Focus Group

    For chairpersons, directors of undergraduate studies, and other departmental leaders, this event provides a venue in which to share ideas and concerns connected with the undergraduate mathematics experience. Those intending to participate are invited to email programs@ams.org by December 4, 2024 (subject line: DUS Focus Group) to be placed on the contact list for this event and to send any questions or topics they would like to be discussed.
    Grand Ballroom D, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Sarah Bryant, American Mathematical Society
    Tyler Kloefkorn, American Mathematical Society
    Contacts:
    Kayla M. Roach, American Mathematical Society
    Sarah Bryant, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 9:40 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
    von Neumann Lecture

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Advances in Distribution Compression
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Lester Mackey*, Stanford University
    (1203--36452)
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Community organizing as a mathematician

    This session is aimed at mathematicians who want to develop stronger ties with the communities in which they live and get involved in community organizing work. The session consists of a panel with local Seattle organizers followed by a round table discussion for participants to reflect on the panel and meet other participants. The panel will consist of four local Seattle organizers doing work around food justice, abortion access, ethics and AI, immigration support, unionization efforts, etc.
    400, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Padi Fuster Aguilera, University of Colorado at Boulder
    Abigail Taylor-Roth, University of Chicago
    Leah Leiner, Temple University
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS Town Hall: Hearing Student Voices: A Town Hall to Discuss a Bridge to Graduate Education

    This town hall invites students to share their opinions on bridge programs and resources for graduate education and in the mathematical sciences.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Alvina Atkinson, American Mathematical Society
    Tyler Kloefkorn, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    JMM Panel on The 1988-91 AMS "Computers and Mathematics" Initiative to Promote and Support the Use of Computers in Research & Education -- And What Followed

    In May 1988, the AMS launched a new section in Notices titled "Computers and Mathematics", to assist members stay abreast of the many new computer tools rapidly becoming available. It ran for six-and-a-half years, publishing 59 feature articles, 19 editorial essays, and 115 reviews of mathematical software packages. The panel will include some of the pioneers adopters who will reminisce on that period, will reflect on where we are with math-tech today, and speculate on the future, including AI.
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Moderators:
    Keith J Devlin, Stanford University
    Organizers:
    Keith J Devlin, Stanford University
    Panelists:
    David H Bailey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Tevian Dray, Oregon State University
    Susanna Dodds Fishel, Arizona State University
    Tamara Munzner, University of British Columbia
    Paul Zorn, St Olaf College
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 10:50 a.m.-11:55 a.m.
    AMS Erdős Lecture for Students

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Title to be announced
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Kristin Lauter*, Meta
    (1203--36454)
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    AMS - MAA Information Session on The Mathematical Education of Teachers III: What Knowledge and Skills Do Mathematics Teachers Need for the 21st Century?

    The Writing Team for the Mathematics Education of Teachers III (MET III) will share themes of the proposed book to garner feedback. Slated for publication by the Conference Board of Mathematical Sciences in 2025, MET III will serve as a resource for those who teach mathematics and statistics to PreK--12 preservice and inservice mathematics teachers. MET III will also be a resource for state departments of education, higher education administrators, and other interested entities.
    609, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Marilyn E Strutchens, Auburn University
    Panelists:
    W Gary Martin, Auburn University
    Yvonne Lai, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Liz Arnold, Montana State University
    Cody L Patterson, Texas State University
    Ricardo Cortez, Tulane University
    Marilyn E Strutchens, Auburn University
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 12:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
    JMM Networking Center - Skybridge

    JMM Networking Center - Skybridge
    Hall 4D - Skybridge, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
    JMM Networking Center - Tahoma Foyer

    JMM Networking Center - Tahoma Foyer
    Tahoma Foyer, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:15 p.m.
    MAA Project NExT:

    609, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Daniel Graybill, Fort Lewis College
    Alexis Hardesty, Texas Woman's University
    Margaret Regan, College of the Holy Cross
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) 1A: Building Conceptual Understanding of Multivariable Calculus using 3D Visualization in CalcPlot3D and 3D-Printed Surfaces

    CalcPlot3D is a free online 3D graphing app designed to enhance the teaching and learning of multivariable calculus. In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn the features of CalcPlot3D, how to use it effectively in their teaching, and how to create explorations. They will also experience a series of small group learning activities using 3D-printed surfaces and CalcPlot3D. These activities help students visualize and better understand a variety of three-dimensional calculus concepts.
    Willow A, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Paul E. Seeburger, Monroe Community College
    Shelby Stanhope, U.S. Air Force Academy
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Professional Enhancement Program (PEP) 2A: Leveraging GitHub and AI for Mathematics Research and Teaching

    Mathematics projects enabled by the GitHub social coding platform include open-source textbooks, databases of mathematical objects, computational software, libraries of formalized mathematics, and more. Participants in this program will learn how to get started with the GitHub platform and the GitHub Copilot AI pair programmer to create and collaborate on mathematical projects with colleagues and students, requiring only a web browser.
    Willow B, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    Steven Craig Clontz, University of South Alabama
    Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:05 p.m.
    AMS Colloquium Lecture I - Svetlana Jitomirskaya, University of California Irvine

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    Title to be announced
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Svetlana Jitomirskaya*, University of California Irvine
    (1203--36472)
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Epidemic Modeling: Current Status and Future Directions, I

    Recent advances in technology have impacted not only the way people receive information but also the way in which information spreads and people behave. These trends have been disruptive in a number of ways, the goal of this workshop is to examine impacts upon contagion modeling and what mathematical techniques can be developed to update classical models in order to provide timely information for policy and decision makers to reduce human harm. An emphasis will be on learning informed models.
    608, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Leigh Metcalf, Carnegie Mellon University leigh@fprime.net
    Heeralal Janwa, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras
    Will Casey, US Naval Academy
    Shirshendu Chatterjee, CUNY
    Ernest Battifarano, Retired

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AIM Special Session on Math Circles for Makers, Creators, and Artists, II

    Math is a human endeavor that provides many opportunities for artistic expression. This session will showcase dynamic and interactive presentations of math circle activities where students, educators, and community members make, create, or perform to explore mathematics. Beyond being great for math circles, these activities can also be fun ways to enrich your mathematics classes.
    3B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nick Rauh, Seattle Universal Math Museum nmrauh@gmail.com
    Tom G. Stojsavljevic, Beloit College
    Gabriella A. Pinter, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
    A. Gwinn Royal, Ivy Tech Community College
    Lauren L Rose, Bard College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on 35th Anniversary of AI and Math, II

    Celebrating the founding in 1990 of the biennial Int'l Symp. on AI and Math (ISAIM), selected past speakers, chairs, and colleagues will present recent research, with a particular emphasis on the foundations of AI and mathematical methods. Participants from a variety of disciplines will provide a unique forum for scientific exchange to foster new areas of applied mathematics and strengthen the scientific underpinnings of AI.
    Skagit 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Martin Charles Golumbic, University of Haifa golumbic@cs.haifa.ac.il
    Frederick Hoffman, Florida Atlantic University
    Contacts:
    Maria Provost, Florida Atlantic University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Advances in Function Theoretic Operator Theory, II

    This session aims to attract both seasoned and early-career researchers to present state-of-the-art techniques and results at the intersection of complex analysis and operator theory. Topics considered will include: function spaces and their operators, reproducing kernel methods and applications (including machine learning and data science), and the interaction of operator theory and several complex variables.
    205, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Christopher Felder, Indiana University Bloomington cfelder@iu.edu
    Raymond Cheng, Old Dominion University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on AI meets Cryptography, I

    The interplay between Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cryptography created a dynamic synergy that influences both domains. Cryptography strengthens AI through privacy-enhancing technologies such as homomorphic encryption and multi-party computation. Meanwhile, AI methods make cryptographic systems more secure and efficient by improving security evaluation and optimizing parameters. This session will feature talks on the fascinating interaction between AI and Cryptography.
    612, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Kristin E. Lauter, Microsoft Research klauter@fb.com
    Shi Bai, Florida Atlantic University
    Emily Wenger, Meta AI

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Algebraic Statistics in Our Changing World, II

    Algebra plays an important role in tackling statistical challenges, due to underlying mathematical structures that arise in modeling and inference. As a result, the field of algebraic statistics has emerged. This session pairs domain-specific expertise and developments in algebraic statistics to form interdisciplinary connections for addressing challenges in our changing world. The session aims to identify areas for progress within these applications with a focus on AI and machine learning.
    Yakima 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Yulia Alexandr, University of California, Los Angeles yulia@math.ucla.edu
    Elizabeth Gross, University of Hawai`i at Manoa
    Jose Israel Rodriguez, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Teresa Yu, University of Michigan

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Applied Category Theory, II

    Applied category theory (ACT) as a burgeoning discipline has gathered interest and attention in a wide range of areas including quantum physics, epidemiological modeling, database theory, artificial intelligence, and game theory. Research and development efforts in ACT involve four major aspects: theory, application, programming tools, and communication. This session will feature talks on all these aspects of ACT, geared towards a broad audience, including students and practitioners.
    Yakima 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Priyaa Varshinee, Topos Institute priyaavarshinee@gmail.com
    Evan Patterson, Topos Institute
    Nelson Niu, University of Washington
    Contacts:
    Priyaa Varshinee, Topos Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Arithmetic Dynamics of Single and Multiple Maps, II

    Arithmetic dynamics is the study of algebraic and number theoretic phenomena arising from self-maps of algebraic varieties. For a morphism or rational self-map f : X --> X of a variety defined over a field K --- which could be a number field, a function field, a p-adic field, or a finite field --- many algebraic and number-theoretic questions arise about natural dynamical structures connected to the orbits of points in X(K) under the action of f.
    604, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Robert L Benedetto, Amherst College rlbenedetto@amherst.edu
    Xander Faber, IDA / Center For Computing Sciences
    Bella Tobin, Agnes Scott College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Business, Entrepreneurship, Government, Industry and Nonprofit (BEGIN) Career Development within Mathematics Programs, II

    Skills training, experiential learning, career readiness, employer relations, and life design activities are important, but often overlooked, components in launching a successful BEGIN career. This session brings together BEGIN employers and mathematical scientists along with university career development experts and mathematics programs staff to discuss how synergies between these groups can enhance emerging mathematicians' knowledge about, and preparation for, careers in BEGIN organizations.
    Skagit 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tony Macula, American Mathematical Society ajm@ams.org

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Coding Theory for Modern Applications, II

    This session brings together mathematics, electrical engineering, and computer science researchers from academia and industry to share cutting-edge work on the fundamentals and classic and modern applications of coding theory.We expect results from some of the most current research on the fundamentals of coding theory and the development of families of codes that satisfy a specific property, such as reliable and secure communication and storage.
    605, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Hiram H. Lopez, Virginia Tech hhlopez@vt.edu
    Allison Beemer, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
    Eduardo Camps Moreno, Virginia Tech
    Rafael D'Oliveira, Clemson University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Cohomology of Arithmetic Groups, Mapping Class Groups, and Moduli Spaces, II

    This session will bring together experts in two fields: geometric group theorists studying arithmetic groups and mapping class groups, and algebraic geometers studying the geometry of moduli spaces. These communities often study the same objects from different perspectives, and our goal is to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration. A particular focus will be on patterns in their unstable cohomology that arise from the study of Steinberg modules, tropicalizations, and weight filtrations.
    614, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Andrew Putman, University of Notre Dame andyp@nd.edu
    Sam Payne, UT Austin

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Conservation Laws and Boundary Value Problems in far from Equilibrium Dynamics, II

    Far from equilibrium dynamics controls many processes in nature and technology, from supernovae to fusion, and is a challenge to study in theory, simulations, data science. Analytically, one needs to solve the conservation laws and singular boundary value problems. Numerical and data modeling impose high demands on the accuracy and scale of computations. The Workshop builds upon recent successes in capturing far from equilibrium dynamics, and reports solutions for fundamentals and applications.
    303, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Snezhana I. Abarzhi, California Institute of Technology snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com
    James G Glimm, State University of New York at Stony Brook

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Dynamical Systems Modeling Approaches Across Multiple Biological Scales, II

    Biological interactions occur in a myriad of different temporal, spatial, and ecological scales. Explicit consideration of such multiscale dynamics has led to a much deeper understanding of ecological and evolutionary phenomena, but has left even more unanswered questions. In this session, we wish to explore the scientific advances that have taken place in modeling biological dynamics that occur on multiple natural scales.
    Skagit 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Chris M. Heggerud, University of California, Davis cmheggerud@ucdavis.edu
    Daniel Brendan Cooney, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    Chadi M Saad-Roy, University of California, Berkeley

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Exploring Dynamics and Bifurcation Analysis of Discrete Dynamical Systems in Mathematical Biology, II

    This proposed special session aims to explore the intersection of discrete dynamical systems and mathematical biology, covering topics like plant-herbivore interactions, predator-prey models, epidemiological dynamics, and more. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, we seek to understand the complex dynamics of biological systems and their implications for artificial intelligence and bio-inspired computing.
    310, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Arzu Bilgin, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University arzu.bilgin@erdogan.edu.tr
    Toufik Khyat, Rider University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Generalized Derivatives: Analysis on Time Scales, Fractional Calculus, Difference Equations, and Others, II

    Generalized derivatives represents a broad theory beyond classical analysis. Difference equations and q-calculus are crucial to important physical models. Time scales calculus is useful when an underlying process contains hybrid measurements. Some types of internal damping can be modeled with fractional or conformable calculus. This special session showcases recent advancements in the areas described above. This includes a broad overview of recent work, theory, modeling, and computations.
    304, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nick Wintz, Lindenwood University nwintz@lindenwood.edu
    Tom Cuchta, Marshall University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Harnessing the Power of Mathematical Models to Understand Population Dynamics, Ecology, and Evolution, II

    Our planet faces a web of environmental threats - habitat loss, invasive species, climate change, and emerging diseases. Yet, scientific inquiry offers a powerful weapon in this fight. This session brings together researchers from theoretical and mathematical ecology, evolutionary ecology, mathematical epidemiology, and related fields. By wielding the power of mathematical models, we aim to illuminate the complexities of these challenges and chart a course toward a more sustainable future.
    Skagit 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Lale Asik, University of the Incarnate Word asik@uiwtx.edu

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Knots, 3-manifolds, and Their Invariants, II

    We will study knots, the properties of various knot models and methods of presentation, knot polynomials and homology theories, and relevant influences from areas ranging from contact geometry to probability theory and combinatorics. Many talks will be accessible to undergraduates.
    617, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Margaret I Doig, Creighton University margaretdoig@creighton.edu
    Kate Petersen, University of Minnesota Duluth
    Christine Ruey Shan Lee, Texas State University
    Shelly Harvey, Rice University
    Moshe Cohen, State University of New York At New Paltz

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Local-to-Global in Apollonian Circle Packings and Beyond, II

    The last decades have seen the discovery of new phenomena in local-to-global questions in thin group and semigroup orbits, and powerful results using analytic techniques, but a gap remains. Such orbits arise in a surprising diversity of areas, including polygonal billiards, continued fractions, closed geodesics, and Apollonian circle packings. Each of these topics, in turn, has fascinating connections to other areas.
    602, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Elena Fuchs, UC Davis efuchs@math.ucdavis.edu
    Katherine E. Stange, University of Colorado, Boulder
    Catherine Maria Hsu, Swarthmore College
    Summer Haag, University of Colorado, Boulder

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematical Frontiers of Data Science for National Security, II

    This special session will highlight the role of mathematics in US government operations, policy making, and research. It aims to demonstrate how mathematics and AI are employed in unique government contexts, including the handling of diverse data types, large datasets, and regulatory compliance. The session will provide insights into government-based mathematical careers and research collaborations, targeting a broad audience from students to researchers.
    Tahoma 1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    R W R Darling, National Security Agency rwdarli@nsa.gov
    Marcus J Bishop, National Security Agency
    John A Emanuello, National Security Agency

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Mathematics of Knowledge Graphs: Theory and Application, II

    The increasing prevalence of knowledge graphs in AI has posed mathematical questions such as: when are other combinatorial structures, beyond (simple, undirected) graphs, more effective representations of knowledge systems? What algorithmic and computational challenges do knowledge graph-based methodologies present -- and how can mathematics help overcome these? We aim to highlight research addressing these and related questions, bringing together those in academia, industry and government.
    Tahoma 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sinan G Aksoy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory sinanaksoy90@gmail.com
    Bill Kay, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Patrick Mackey, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Modeling Natural Resources, II

    This session addresses mathematical modeling of natural resources including soil, air, water, fisheries, wildlife, and forestry systems, as well as threatened and endangered species, ecological implications of climate change, community dynamics, ecological invasions and range limits, and disease vectors. Mathematical modeling encompasses a wide range of research areas and involves data science and artificial intelligence. MSC's include 34, 35, 37, 39, 49, 62, 65, 90, 91, and 92.
    Skagit 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Catherine A Roberts, College of the Holy Cross croberts@holycross.edu
    Shandelle Henson, Andrews University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on New Trends in Lie Theory and Mathematical Physics, II

    Recent advances in the geometric Langlands program and its connections to supersymmetric quantum field theory have spurred a new wave of physical applications of Lie theory. At the same time, Lie theory is also emerging as powerful paradigm in the mathematical study of quantum computating. The goal of this special session is to discuss these emerging trends with special emphasis on logarithmic conformal field theory, quantum computational complexity, and supersymmetric quantum mechanics.
    606, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Marco Aldi, Virginia Commonwealth University maldi2@vcu.edu
    Juan Villarreal, University of Bath

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Partition Theory and $q$-Series, II

    Theory of partitions (elementary, analytic, and combinatorial) in all aspects: q-series, hypergeometric functions, and algebraic combinatorics; related objects including but not limited to compositions, overpartitions, and plane partitions; and aspects of research tools useful in the field such as relevant results on classes of modular forms, particularly eta-quotients, and proof techniques for generating functions.
    Tahoma 3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    William Jonathan Keith, Michigan Technological University wjkeith@mtu.edu
    Dennis Eichhorn, University of California, Irvine
    Brandt Kronholm, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Polymath Jr REU Student Research Session, II

    The Polymath Jr REU program consists of research projects in a variety of mathematical topics and runs in the spirit of the Polymath Project. Each project is mentored by an active researcher with experience in undergraduate mentoring, and assisted by graduate students and post-docs who gain research in designing research programs. This session presents some recent work of participants.
    Chelan 2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Steven Joel Miller, Williams College sjm1@williams.edu
    Zhanar Berikkyzy, Fairfeld University
    Adam Sheffer, Baruch College, CUNY

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Advancements in the Numerical Analysis of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, II

    This special session will highlight and address some of the current challenges for solving nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) numerically. PDEs have wide-ranging applications, and numerical methods remain an important tool for the understanding of solutions to PDEs. The emphasis in this session will be on theoretical results and computational results for reliably approximating solutions to nonlinear problems that are at the forefront of numerical PDEs.
    213, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Thomas Lee Lewis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro tllewis3@uncg.edu
    Yi Zhang, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Recent Developments in Regularization Methods for Nonlinear Inverse Problems, II

    This special session will present cutting-edge advancements in regularization methodologies specifically designed for nonlinear inverse problems. These encompass parameter identification in partial differential equations, image registration, the integration of machine learning and deep learning techniques, neural networks, stochastic approximation methods, geological and financial modeling, and elasticity imaging, focusing on their diverse medical applications, among other pertinent topics.
    210, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Akhtar A. Khan, Rochester Institute of Technology aaksma@rit.edu
    Otmar Scherzer, University of Vienna
    Bernd Hofmann, Chemnitz University of Technology

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Research from the Graduate Research Workshop in Combinatorics, II

    The Graduate Research Workshop in Combinatorics (GRWC) is an intensive 2-week summer research workshop, with the goal of engaging in original research while also building the research networks of participating graduate students and postdocs. This special session will include an overview talk on the GRWC history and format, with the remaining talks delivered by prior participants on research started during a recent iteration of the GRWC.
    Tahoma 5, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Puck Rombach, University of Vermont puck.rombach@uvm.edu
    Steve Butler, Iowa State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Several Complex Variables, Partial Differential Equations, and CR Geometry, II

    Several complex variables exhibits deep interactions with various mathematical fields, in particular with Partial Differential Equations and CR Geometry. This workshop is focused on recent developments in these three subject areas. As such, we bring together a group of senior and junior experts to present their recent research as well as to discuss open problems in these areas.
    201, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Jiri Lebl, Oklahoma State University lebl@okstate.edu
    Sean N. Curry, Oklahoma State University
    Anne-Katrin Gallagher, Gallagher Tool & Instrument, Redmond, WA

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Theoretical and Numerical Aspects of Fractional and Nonlocal Models, II

    Nonlocal models have attracted interest using integral and integro-differential operators instead of differential operators. They require less regularity for the input functions and capture multiple scales of interaction, giving more flexibility to model physical phenomena.Peridynamics uses nonlocal operators to model deformations. Fractional derivatives are employed to describe viscoelasticity and phase transitions. Nonlocal models are studied with numerical methods and machine learning.
    203, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Nicole Buczkowski, Worcester Polytechnic Institute nbuczkowski@wpi.edu
    Animesh Biswas, University of Nebraska Lincoln
    Qiao Zhuang, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological Data Analysis: Theory and Applications, II

    The field of topological data analysis (TDA) seeks to apply some of the tools of algebraic topology, especially the homology of chain complexes, to infer geometric structures and features in large datasets. Applications are found in shape and image analysis, material science, robotics, social network analysis, and climate and environmental science. At the same time, a robust theory of TDA is being developed with the help of category theory and representation theory.
    620, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Shaun Van Ault, Valdosta State University svault@valdosta.edu
    Jose A. Velez-Marulanda, Valdosta State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological Machine Learning, II

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) are cornerstones of recent progress in science, supported by insights and advancements in mathematics. This session focuses on topology in AI/ML, which is well-suited to dealing with real and noisy data due to its flexibility to perturbations and ability to model complex interactions. Emphasis is on the use of topological thinking to enable creation of novel models, providing interesting insights into applications impacted by these advances.
    607, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Stephen J Young, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory stephen.young@pnnl.gov
    Brett Jefferson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Branden Stone, Georgia Tech Research Institute

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS Special Session on Topological, Algebraic, and Geometric Methods for Safe, Robust, and Explainable Machine Learning, II

    This special session showcases research that applies ideas from topology, algebra, and geometry to the goal of increasing the safety, robustness, or explainability of modern machine learning. We will feature research that (i) proposes novel approaches to machine learning by drawing on tools and ideas from topology, algebra, and geometry or (ii) uses mathematics to illuminate how and why existing state-of-the-art models work as well as they do in some situations but fail in others.
    613, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Henry Kvinge, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory henry.kvinge@pnnl.gov
    Tegan Emerson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Tim Doster, Pacific Northwest National Lab
    Scott Mahan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Sarah McGuire, Michigan State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AMS-SIMODE Special Session on Modeling Matters in Teaching and Learning Differential Equations, II

    Modeling matters in teaching and learning differential equations in two ways (1) modeling should shape the course matter and (2) modeling matters to students to show the rationale for studying differential equations. We seek talks in which both matters are considered, namely, demonstrate the modeling matter or content used to motivate learning and showing teachers that it matters just how they bring students to the mathematics of differential equations by learning in context.
    Chelan 4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 800 Pike
    Organizers:
    Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA BrianWinkel@simiode.org
    Kyle T Allaire, Worcester State University, Worcester MA USA
    Lisa Naples, Fairfield University, Fairfield CT USA
    Pushpi Paranamana, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame IN USA

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    AWM Special Session on Women in Mathematical Biology, II

    In recent years, there has been broad interest in applications of mathematics in biology and medicine. Different stochastic and deterministic models, and numerical and statistical approaches have been developed to study various fields of mathematical biology, such as ecology, immunology, epidemiology, and many more. This special session will highlight these new developments along with the diverse group of researchers who drive innovation. We will have an open lunch gathering open to all.
    4C-1, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Hwayeon Ryu, Elon University hryu@elon.edu
    Karin Leiderman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Robyn Shuttleworth, Altos Labs
    Lihong Zhao, Virginia Tech
    Christina Edholm, Scripps College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    BSM Special Session: Mathematical Research in Budapest for Students and Faculty

    This session will highlight research across several mathematical topics conducted by students and faculty in conjunction with their participation in the BSM programs in Budapest. Those programs include the BSM undergraduate research courses, the Director's Mathematician in Residence (DMiR) program and the BSM Fulbright opportunities.
    616, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Kristina Cole Garrett, Budapest Semesters in Mathematics garrettk@stolaf.edu

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    CRM-PIMS-AARMS Special Session on Indigenous Voices in Mathematics, II

    This session will highlight the research of Indigenous mathematicians, showcasing the breadth and depth of their contributions across various mathematical disciplines. From theoretical research to practical applications and advancements in math education, Indigenous scholars bring a rich diversity of perspectives to mathematics.
    615, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Kamuela E. Yong, University of Hawaii West Oahu kamuela.yong@hawaii.edu

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Matrix Analysis and Applications, II

    The organizers are proposing an ILAS special session titled "Matrix Analysis and Applications" at JMM 2025. The aim is to stimulate research in matrix analysis and its applications. This session will serve as a platform for researcher from various backgrounds to showcase their discoveries. We are committed to encourage broad participation, welcoming graduate students, postdoc researchers, early career individuals, as well as well-established researchers, to attend and contribute to the session.
    211, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Tin-Yau Tam, University of Nevada, Reno ttam@unr.edu
    Mohsen Aliabadi, University of California, San Diego
    Luyining Gan, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    ILAS Special Session on Strong Properties of Matrix Classes, II

    Since the mid 2000s there has been a flurry of work that studies various strong properties associated with spectral properties of matrices and their graphs or digraphs These strong properties have allowed significant progress in the study of related matrix invariants and led to nice connections with graph minors, and graph propagation procedures. These have given rise to new matrix and graph theoretic questions and results. This session will provide updates on this evolving area of mathematics.
    204, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Bryan L Shader, University of Wyoming bshader@uwyo.edu
    Minerva Catral, Xavier University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    MAA Special Session on Fostering Creativity in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses, I

    Creativity is an integral part of practicing mathematicians' work, but it is seldom explicitly valued or fostered in undergraduate mathematics courses. For this session, we invite proposals that faculty believe can be successful in producing creative results from students in an undergraduate mathematics course, including theoretical frameworks, pedagogical techniques, tasks, and co-creating classroom environments.
    619, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Milos Savic, University of Oklahoma Savic@ou.edu
    Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
    Gail Tang, University of La Verne
    Houssein El Turkey, University of New Haven
    Emily Cilli-Turner, University of San Diego
    Visala Rani Satyam, Virginia Commonwealth University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Special Session on SIAM Minisymposium on Modern Uncertainty Quantification in Theory and in Practice

    2B, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Amy Braverman, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Caltech) Amy.Braverman@jpl.nasa.gov

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    SIGMAA Special Session on Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology, I

    This session is dedicated to undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology. This session highlights research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology. The session also addresses the logistics of starting and maintaining an undergraduate research program in this area.
    610, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Timothy D Comar, self-employed timcomar@gmail.com
    Anne E. Yust, University of Pittsburgh
    Erin N Bodine, Rhodes College

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    SLMath (MSRI) Special Session on Metric Geometry and Topology, II

    This special session will focus on the relationship between global metric geometry and topology, including methods of Riemannian geometry as well as Alexandrov geometry and other singular geometric spaces. We expect the variety of intersecting interests will stimulate discussion and promote cross-fertilization of ideas.
    611, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Christine M. Escher, Oregon State University escherc@oregonstate.edu
    Catherine Searle, Wichita State University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
    TPSE Contributed Paper Session on Transformation Models for Inclusive Student Experiences, II

    618, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Ben Ford, Sonoma State University ben.ford@sonoma.edu
    Aris Winger, Georgia Gwinnett College
    Omayra Ortega, Sonoma State University
    Luis Antonio Leyva, Vanderbilt-Peabody College
    Brigitte Lahme, Sonoma State University
    Abbe Herzig, Bard Prison Initiative
    Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University

  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
    AMS Committee on Publications Panel Discussion: Artificial Intelligence and Publishing

    This panel discussion will survey the effects of artificial intelligence on mathematical publishing, with an eye towards issues directly affecting AMS and its members.
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Kiran S Kedlaya, University of California San Diego
    Robert M Harington, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    Association for Symbolic Logic Tutorial:

    2A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sergei Starchenko, University of Notre Dame
    David Reed Solomon, University of Connecticut
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
    JMM Workshop: Developing Online Mathematics Courses: Strategies to Consider

    This workshop will focus on key factors that must be considered while designing and developing an online course that is student-oriented, engaging and accessible. As Artificial Intelligence is becoming a part of student learning, adaptive courseware(s) provide a multi-prong method for learning, assessment and teaching in online settings. Presenters will highlight key opportunities to support online mathematics learning through existing AI-based adaptive courseware.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Sharmila Sivalingam, Maryville University of St. Louis
    Pamela Bryan Williams, Chief Strategist | Learning Design and Development Maryville University | School of Adult & Online Education
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
    PME Panel: What Every Student Should Know about the JMM

    Navigating a large conference can be overwhelming, even for those who have previously attended such an event. Common questions may include: How do I get the most out of the program? What sessions are especially for students? What other events should I be on the lookout for? How can I get some cool, free math stuff? Students and their faculty mentors are encouraged to attend. This panel is sponsored by the Pi Mu Epsilon Mathematics Honorary Society.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Stephanie Edwards, Hope College
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 2:10 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    AMS Invited Address

    Organizers:
    Brian D. Boe, University of Georgia
    One Hundred Years of Morse Theory
    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Mohammed Abouzaid*, Stanford University
    (1203--36482)
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    AMS Committee on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Panel Discussion: How can Mathematics and Mathematicians Mitigate Bias and Other Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Issues in AI

    The use of AI offers vast potential for transformation of society but also raises significant concerns for equity, diversity, and inclusion. This panel will address the topic of bias in AI broadly understood and with a focus on the role of both mathematics and mathematicians. The goal of the panel will be to discuss these issues to understand them better, to consider how mathematics can help to address them, and to build awareness in the mathematical community.
    4C-2, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Lily Khadjavi, Loyola Marymount University
    John M. Voight, Dartmouth
    Jay-C Reyes, Center for Communications Research-La Jolla
    Darryl Yong, Harvey Mudd College
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    JMM Panel on The Mathematics of Mass Incarceration

    The size of the incarcerated population in the U.S. has exploded in recent decades. This panel will address various ways in which incarceration is relevant to the mathematics and statistics professions through both scholarship and education. Topics will include the history of incarceration by the numbers; race, gender, and incarceration; higher education for incarcerated students; prison gerrymandering; criminogenic settings, and mathematical modeling of the school-to-prison pipeline.
    4C-3, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Moderators:
    Francis Edward Su, Harvey Mudd College
    Organizers:
    Abbe Herzig, Bard Prison Initiative
    Panelists:
    Aris Winger, Georgia Gwinnett College
    Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
    Geillan Aly, Compassionate Math
    Johnny "Dell" Pippins, University of Iowa
    Arlyss Herzig, Brennan Center for Justice
    Katherine Pearce, University of Texas
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    MAA Panel: Undergraduate Research in Mathematics for Addressing the Sustainable Development Goals in the Age of AI

    Undergraduate math research on the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the AI era offers significant academic and skill-building opportunities. This panel explores the benefits and challenges of mentoring such projects, comparing them to traditional studies and emphasizing their job market relevance. It features educators experienced in AI-related sustainability research, providing insights and practical advice for faculty mentors.
    4C-4, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Vinodh Kumar Chellamuthu, Utah Tech University
    Haseeb Kazi, Trine University
    Lauren L Rose, Bard College
    Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University
    Brandy S. Wiegers, College of Idaho
    Cara Sulyok, Lewis University
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 3:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
    AWM Business Meeting

    603, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Darla Kremer, Association for Women in Mathematics darla@awm-math.org
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 4:30 p.m.-5:45 p.m.
    MAA Project NExT:

    609, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Christina Duron, Pepperdine University
    Erin Ellefsen, Earlham College
    Aaron Osgood-Zimmerman, Bucknell University
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 4:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
    Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 4:45 p.m.-5:45 p.m.
    Awards Celebration

    Ballroom 6E, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Boris Hasselblatt, Tufts University
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 6:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.
    Exhibits and Book Sales

    Hall 4A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.
    Grand Opening Reception

    The JMM officially opens with festivities to celebrate our vibrant mathematical community. After a brief ribbon-cutting, the mathematical art display, vendor, and exhibitor booths will all be available to you, along with hors d'oeuvres, beverages, and entertainment. ALL are Welcome! FREE! Meet up with friends or explore on your own, but be sure to take in all the fun, refreshments, and special offerings. Travel each aisle -- many exhibitors are planning special offerings just for this evening.
    Hall 4A, Seattle Convention Center Arch at 705 Pike
    Organizers:
    Penny Pina, American Mathematical Society
  • Wednesday January 8, 2025, 8:45 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
    Yearly Gather: Collaborative Puzzle Time!

    All are invited to enjoy a brand new mathematical puzzle created specially for this year's JMM in this session hosted by {MathILy, MathILy-Er, MathILy-EST} staff. We can also answer your questions about the {MathILy, MathILy-Er} summer programs for high-school students and the MathILy-EST REU for early college students.
    Ravenna BC, Sheraton Grand Seattle
    Organizers:
    sarah-marie belcastro, MathILy and Mathematical Staircase, Inc.
    Jonah Ostroff, University of Washington
    Corrine Yap, MathILy-Er and Georgia Institute of Technology
    Thomas C. Hull, MathILy-EST and Franklin and Marshall College